A_CHAPTER08 - Reforming American Society A religious...

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Textile mill in 1834. Reforming American Society A religious revival sparks reform movements, including calls to outlaw slavery. Factory laborers begin to demand better working conditions. A women’s rights movement forms. NEXT
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SECTION 1 SECTION 2 SECTION 3 SECTION 4 Religion Sparks Reform Slavery and Abolition Women and Reform The Changing Workplace NEXT Reforming American Society
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Section 1 Religion Sparks Reform A renewal of religious sentiment—known as the Second Great Awakening—inspires a host of reform movements. NEXT
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The Second Great Awakening Religious Activism Second Great Awakening —religious movement, sweeps U.S. after 1790 • Individual responsible for own salvation, can improve self, society • Preacher Charles Grandison Finney inspires emotional religious faith • Large gatherings; some preachers get 20,000 or more at outdoor camps Religion Sparks Reform 1 SECTION NEXT Image Continued . . . Revivalism Revival —gathering to awaken religious faith; lasts 4 to 5 days • Revivalism greatly increases church membership
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The African-American Church • Camp meetings, Baptist, Methodist churches open to blacks and whites • Southern slaves interpret Christian message as promise of freedom • In East, free African Americans have own churches • African Methodist Episcopal Church—political, cultural, social place • African-American church organizes first national convention (1830) 1 SECTION NEXT continued The Second Great Awakening
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Transcendentalism and Reforms Transcendentalism Ralph Waldo Emerson leads group practicing transcendentalism : - literary and philosophical movement - emphasizes simple life - truth found in nature, emotion, imagination Henry David Thoreau puts self-reliance into practice, writes Walden • Thoreau urges civil disobedience , peaceful refusal to obey laws 1 SECTION NEXT Image Unitarianism • Unitarians stress reason, appeals to conscience in religion • Agree with revivalists: individual, social reform important
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Americans Form Ideal Communities Utopias Utopian communities —experimental groups, try to create perfect place • In 1841, transcendentalist George Ripley establishes Brook Farm • Most utopias last only a few years 1 SECTION NEXT Shaker Communities • Shakers share goods, believe men and women equal, refuse to fight • Do not marry or have children; need converts, adoption to survive Image
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Schools and Prisons Undergo Reform Reforming Asylums and Prisons Dorothea Dix gets 10 states to improve conditions for mentally ill • Reformers stress rehabilitation to obtain useful position in society 1 SECTION NEXT Improving Education • In early 1800s, school not compulsory, not divided by grade • Pennsylvania establishes tax-supported public
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This note was uploaded on 02/02/2010 for the course GOVT 131 taught by Professor Kenroberts during the Fall '07 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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A_CHAPTER08 - Reforming American Society A religious...

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