A_CHAPTER10 - The Union in Peril Slavery becomes the...

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Dred Scott portrait The Union in Peril Slavery becomes the dominant issue in U.S. politics, leading to the birth of new political parties, the election of Abraham Lincoln, and the secession of Southern states. NEXT
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SECTION 1 SECTION 2 SECTION 3 SECTION 4 The Divisive Politics of Slavery Protest, Resistance, and Violence The Birth of the Republican Party Slavery and Secession NEXT The Union in Peril
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Section 1 The Divisive Politics of Slavery The issue of slavery dominates U.S. politics in the early 1850s. NEXT
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Differences Between North and South Industry and Immigration in the North • 1850s North industrialized; makes large amount, variety of products • Railroads carry raw materials east, manufactures and settlers west - small towns quickly become cities - telegraph wires provide fast communication • Immigrants become industrial workers, fear expansion of slavery - slave labor might compete with free labor - could reduce status of white workers unable to compete The Divisive Politics of Slavery 1 SECTION NEXT Continued . . . Map
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Agriculture and Slavery in the South • South predominantly rural, mostly plantations and small farms • Economy relies on cash crops; manufacture under 10% of U.S. goods • Few immigrants; free, enslaved African Americans meet labor needs • In 3 states, blacks are majority; in 2, are half of population • Whites fear restriction of slavery will change society, economy 1 SECTION NEXT continued Differences Between North and South Map
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Slavery in the Territories The Wilmot Proviso Wilmot Proviso —no slavery in territory acquired from Mexico • North: slave territory adds slave states; no jobs for free workers • South: slaves are property under Constitution; fear more free states 1 SECTION NEXT Statehood for California • 1850, CA writes constitution; elects leaders; applies for statehood • Pres. Zachary Taylor supports admission of California as free state • Recommends to angry South that slavery be decided by each territory
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The Senate Debates Clay’s Compromise • Some Southerners threaten secession , withdrawal of state from Union • Henry Clay offers Compromise of 1850 to settle disputes over slavery 1 SECTION NEXT Continued . . .
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continued The Senate Debates Terms of the Compromise • Compromise has provisions to appease North and South: - California to be a free state - more effective fugitive slave law - popular sovereignty —residents of territory vote to decide slavery - government to pay Texas $10 million for its claim to eastern NM - slave trade banned in D.C. but slavery permitted • Clay gives speech begging North and South to compromise, save Union 1 SECTION NEXT Continued . . .
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continued The Senate Debates
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A_CHAPTER10 - The Union in Peril Slavery becomes the...

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