A_CHAPTER12 - Reconstruction and Its Effects The U.S....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ruins in Charleston, South Carolina. Reconstruction and Its Effects The U.S. begins to rebuild the South, but former slaves face new challenges as support fades for the policies of Reconstruction. NEXT
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
NEXT Reconstruction and Its Effects SECTION 1 SECTION 2 SECTION 3 The Politics of Reconstruction Reconstructing Society The Collapse of Reconstruction
Background image of page 2
Section 1 The Politics of Reconstruction Congress opposes Lincoln’s and Johnson’s plans for Reconstruction and instead implements its own plan to rebuild the South. NEXT
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Lincoln’s Plan for Reconstruction Lincoln’s Ten-Percent Plan Reconstruction —period of rebuilding after Civil War, 1865–1877 • Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction calls for 10% allegiance Radical Republicans led by Charles Sumner, Thaddeus Stevens - want to destroy power of former slaveholders - give full citizenship, suffrage to African Americans The Politics of Reconstruction 1 SECTION NEXT Radical Reaction • 1864 Wade-Davis Bill makes Congress responsible for Reconstruction • Lincoln uses pocket veto to kill Wade-Davis; Radicals outraged Image
Background image of page 4
Johnson Continues Lincoln’s Policies • President Andrew Johnson proposes own Presidential Reconstruction: - states must swear allegiance, annul war debts, ratify 13 th Amendment - does not address voting rights, land, laws for former slaves • States that had not applied under Lincoln agree to Johnson’s terms - some states do not fully comply 1 SECTION NEXT Johnson’s Plan Continued . . .
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
continued Johnson’s Plan Presidential Reconstruction Comes to a Standstill • Radical Republicans in Congress refuse new Southern legislators • Congress enlarges Freedmen’s Bureau —helps former slaves, poor whites - gives social services, medical care, education 1 SECTION NEXT Continued . . .
Background image of page 6
continued Johnson’s Plan Civil Rights Act of 1866 • Congress passes Civil Rights Act of 1866: - grants citizenship to African Americans - forbids black codes or discriminatory laws • Black codes restore many restrictions of slavery • Whites use violence to prevent blacks from improving their lives • Johnson vetoes Freedmen’s Bureau and Civil Rights Act • Alienates moderate Republicans; angers Radicals 1 SECTION NEXT
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Congressional Reconstruction Moderates and Radicals Join Forces • In mid-1866, moderate Republicans join Radicals to override veto • Draft Fourteenth Amendment —makes African Americans full citizens • Most Southern states reject amendment; not ratified until 1868 1 SECTION NEXT Continued . . . 1866 Congressional Elections • Johnson jeered on tour urging election of supporters of his plan • Moderates, Radicals win 2/3 majority in Congress, can override veto
Background image of page 8
continued Congressional Reconstruction Reconstruction Act of 1867 • 1867 Reconstruction Act doesn’t recognize most new state governments - divides South into military districts - sets new conditions for reentry in Union • Johnson believes act unconstitutional, vetoes;
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/02/2010 for the course GOVT 131 taught by Professor Kenroberts during the Fall '07 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

Page1 / 29

A_CHAPTER12 - Reconstruction and Its Effects The U.S....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online