A_CHAPTER15 - Immigrants and Urbanization Immigration from...

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City street. Immigrants and Urbanization Immigration from Europe, Asia, Mexico, and the Caribbean forces cities to confront overcrowding. Local and national political corruption sparks calls for reform. NEXT
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NEXT Immigrants and Urbanization SECTION 1 SECTION 2 SECTION 3 The New Immigrants The Challenges of Urbanization Politics in the Gilded Age
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Section 1 The New Immigrants Immigration from Europe, Asia, the Caribbean, and Mexico reach a new high in the late 19 th and early 20 th centuries. NEXT
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Through the “Golden Door” Millions of Immigrants • Some immigrants seek better lives; others temporary jobs The New Immigrants 1 SECTION NEXT Europeans • 1870–1920, about 20 million Europeans arrive in U.S. • Many flee religious persecution: Jews driven from Russia by pogroms • Population growth results in lack of farmland, industrial jobs • Reform movements, revolts influence young who seek independent lives Continued . . . Interactive
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Chinese and Japanese • About 300,000 Chinese arrive; earliest one attracted by gold rush - work in railroads, farms, mines, domestic service, business • Japanese work on Hawaiian plantations, then go to West Coast - by 1920, more than 200,000 on West Coast 1 SECTION NEXT continued Through the “Golden Door” The West Indies and Mexico • About 260,000 immigrants from West Indies; most seek industrial jobs • Mexicans flee political turmoil; after 1910, 700,000 arrive • National Reclamation Act creates farmland, draws Mexican farmers Interactive
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Life in the New Land A Difficult Journey • Almost all immigrants travel by steamship, most in steerage 1 SECTION NEXT Ellis Island Ellis Island —chief U.S. immigration station, in New York Harbor • Immigrants given physical exam by doctor; seriously ill not admitted • Inspector checks documents to see if meets legal requirements • 1892–1924, about 17 million immigrants processed at Ellis Island Image Continued . . .
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continued Life in the New Land Angel Island Angel Island —immigrant processing station in San Francisco Bay • Immigrants endure harsh questioning, long detention for admission 1 SECTION NEXT Cooperation for Survival • Immigrants must create new life: find work, home, learn new ways • Many seek people who share cultural values, religion, language - ethnic communities form • Friction develops between “hyphenated” Americans, native-born
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This note was uploaded on 02/02/2010 for the course GOVT 131 taught by Professor Kenroberts during the Fall '07 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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A_CHAPTER15 - Immigrants and Urbanization Immigration from...

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