A_CHAPTER19

A_CHAPTER19 - The First World War Domestic life is greatly...

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Soldiers during World War I The First World War Domestic life is greatly affected as the U.S. helps the Allies achieve victory in World War I. The Treaty of Versailles punishes Germany, but is never ratified by the U.S. Senate. NEXT
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SECTION 1 SECTION 2 SECTION 3 SECTION 4 World War I Begins American Power Tips the Balance The War at Home Wilson Fights for Peace NEXT The First World War
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Section 1 World War I Begins As World War I intensifies, the United States is forced to abandon its neutrality. NEXT
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Causes of World War I Nationalism Nationalism —devotion to interests, culture of one’s nation • Nationalism leads to competition, antagonism between nations • Many fear Germany’s growing power in Europe • Various ethnic groups resent domination, want independence • Russia sees self as protector of all Slavic peoples World War I Begins 1 SECTION NEXT Continued . . . Imperialism • Germany industrializes, competes with France, Britain for colonies
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Militarism • Cost of building, defending empires leads to more military spending Militarism —development of armed forces, their use in diplomacy • By 1890, Germany has strongest army on European continent - competes with Britain for sea power - leads other powers to join naval arms race 1 SECTION NEXT continued Causes of World War I Alliance System • Triple Entente or Allies —France, Britain, Russia • Germany, Austria-Hungary, Ottoman Empire are Central Powers • Alliances give security; nations unwilling to tip balance of power
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An Assassination Leads to War Alliances Complicate Conflict • Balkan Peninsula known as “the powder keg of Europe” because: - ethnic rivalries among Balkan peoples - leading powers have economic, political interests Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria shot by Serbian nationalist • Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia, expects short war • Alliance system pulls one nation after another into war 1 SECTION NEXT Map
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The Fighting Starts Early Battles • Germany’s Schlieffen Plan: hold Russia, defeat France, then Russia • German troops sweep through Belgium, cause major refugee crisis • By spring 1915, 2 parallel systems of trenches cross France • “ No man’s land ”—barren expanse of mud between opposing trenches • Scale of killing horrific, fighting inconclusive • Armies fight to gain only yards of ground in bloody trench warfare 1 SECTION NEXT Interactive Interactive
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Americans Question Neutrality Divided Loyalties • Socialists, pacifists, many ordinary people against U.S. in war • Naturalized citizens concerned about effect on country of birth • Many feel ties to British ancestry, language, democracy, legal system • U.S. has stronger economic ties with Allies than with Central Powers 1 SECTION NEXT Chart
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The War Hits Home The U.S. Prepares • By 1917, U.S. has mobilized for war against Central Powers to: - ensure Allied repayment of debts - prevent Germans threat to U.S. shipping 1 SECTION NEXT The British Blockade • British blockade, mine North Sea, stop war
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This note was uploaded on 02/02/2010 for the course GOVT 131 taught by Professor Kenroberts during the Fall '07 term at Cornell.

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A_CHAPTER19 - The First World War Domestic life is greatly...

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