A_CHAPTER25 - The United States in World War II The U.S....

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A U.S. tank passes the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, during the liberation from German occupation (August 1944). The United States in World War II The U.S. helps lead the Allies to victory in World War II, but only after dropping atomic bombs on Japan. American veterans discover new economic opportunities, but also simmering social tensions. NEXT
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SECTION 1 SECTION 2 SECTION 3 SECTION 4 Mobilizing for Defense The War for Europe and North Africa The War in the Pacific The Home Front NEXT The United States in World War II
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Section 1 Mobilizing for Defense Following the attack on Pearl Harbor, the United States mobilizes for war. NEXT
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Americans Join the War Effort Selective Service and the GI • After Pearl Harbor, 5 million men volunteer for military service • 10 million more drafted to meet needs of two-front war Mobilizing for Defense 1 SECTION NEXT Continued . . . Expanding the Military • General George Marshall Army Chief of Staff— calls for women’s corps Women’s Auxiliary Army Corps (WAAC) women in noncombat positions • Thousands enlist; “auxiliary” dropped, get full U. S. army benefits Image
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Recruiting and Discrimination • Minority groups are denied basic citizenship rights • Question whether they should fight for democracy in other countries 1 SECTION NEXT continued Americans Join the War Effort Dramatic Contributions • 300,000 Mexican Americans join armed forces • 1 million African Americans serve; live, work in segregated units • 13,000 Chinese Americans and 33,000 Japanese Americans serve • 25,000 Native Americans enlist Image
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A Production Miracle The Industrial Response • Factories convert from civilian to war production • Shipyards, defense plants expand, new ones built • Produce ships, arms rapidly - use prefabricated parts - people work at record speeds 1 SECTION NEXT Image Continued . . .
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continued A Production Miracle Labor’s Contribution • Nearly 18 million workers in war industries; 6 million are women • Over 2 million minorities hired; face strong discrimination at first A. Philip Randolph , head of Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters • Organizes march on D.C.; FDR executive order forbids discrimination 1 SECTION NEXT Mobilization of Scientists • Office of Scientific Research and Development— technology, medicine Manhattan Project develops atomic bomb
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The Federal Government Takes Control Economic Controls Office of Price Administration (OPA) freezes prices, fights inflation • Higher taxes, purchase of war bonds lower demand for scarce goods War Production Board (WPB) says which companies convert production - allocates raw materials - organizes collection of recyclable materials 1 SECTION NEXT Rationing Rationing fixed allotments of goods needed by military Image
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A_CHAPTER25 - The United States in World War II The U.S....

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