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A_CHAPTER30 - The Vietnam War Years The United States...

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A U.S. marine in Vietnam (1968). The Vietnam War Years The United States becomes locked in a military stalemate in Southeast Asia. U.S. forces withdraw after a decade of heavy war casualties abroad and assassinations and antiwar demonstrations at home. NEXT
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NEXT The Vietnam War Years SECTION 1 SECTION 2 SECTION 3 SECTION 4 Moving Toward Conflict U.S. Involvement and Escalation A Nation Divided 1968: A Tumultuous Year SECTION 5 The End of the War and Its Legacy
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Section 1 Moving Toward Conflict To stop the spread of communism in Southeast Asia, the United States uses its military to support South Vietnam. NEXT
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America Supports France in Vietnam French Rule in Vietnam Late 1800s–WW II, France rules most of Indochina Ho Chi Minh —leader of Vietnamese independence movement - helps create Indochinese Communist Party 1940, Japanese take control of Vietnam Vietminh —organization that aims to rid Vietnam of foreign rule Sept. 1945, Ho Chi Minh declares Vietnam an independent nation Moving Toward Conflict 1 SECTION NEXT Continued . . . Image
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France Battles the Vietminh French troops move into Vietnam; French fight, regain cities, South 1950, U.S. begins economic aid to France to stop communism 1 SECTION NEXT continued America Supports France in Vietnam The Vietminh Drive Out the French Domino theory —countries can fall to communism like row of dominoes 1954, Vietminh overrun French at Dien Bien Phu ; France surrenders Geneva Accords divide Vietnam at 17 th parallel; Communists get north Election to unify country called for in 1956 Map
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The United States Steps In Diem Cancels Elections Ho has brutal, repressive regime but is popular for land distribution S. Vietnam’s anti-Communist president Ngo Dinh Diem refuses election U.S. promises military aid for stable, reform government in South Diem corrupt, stifles opposition, restricts Buddhism Vietcong (Communist opposition group in South) kills officials Ho sends arms to Vietcong along Ho Chi Minh Trail 1 SECTION NEXT Continued . . . Map
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continued The United States Steps In Kennedy and Vietnam Like Eisenhower, JFK backs Diem financially; sends military advisers Diem’s popularity plummets from corruption, lack of land reform Diem starts strategic hamlet program to fight Vietcong - villagers resent being moved from ancestral homes Diem presses attacks on Buddhism; monks burn themselves in protest U.S.-supported military coup topples government; Diem assassinated 1 SECTION NEXT
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President Johnson Expands the Conflict The South Grows More Unstable Succession of military leaders rule S. Vietnam; country unstable LBJ thinks U.S. can lose international prestige if communists win 1 SECTION NEXT The Tonkin Gulf Resolution Alleged attack in Gulf of Tonkin; LBJ asks for power to repel enemy 1964 Tonkin Gulf Resolution gives him broad military powers 1965 8 Americans killed, LBJ orders sustained bombing of North U.S. combat troops sent to S. Vietnam to battle Vietcong
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Section 2 U.S. Involvement
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