Equipotential surfaces for an isolated point charge

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Unformatted text preview: add them Potential of a Charge • Now remove one charge • The potential due to charge q2 is • The equipotential surfaces for an isolated point charge are a family of spheres concentric with the charge E and V for an Infinite Sheet of Charge • The equipotential lines are the dashed blue lines • The electric field lines are the brown lines • The equipotential lines are everywhere perpendicular to the field lines E and V for a Point Charge • The equipotential lines are the dashed blue lines • The electric field lines are the brown lines • The equipotential lines are everywhere perpendicular to the field lines E and V for a Dipole • The equipotential lines are the dashed blue lines • The electric field lines are the brown lines • The equipotential lines are everywhere perpendicular to the field lines Electric Potential for a Continuous Charge Distribution • Consider a small charge element dq – Treat it as a point charge • The potential at some point due to this charge element is V for a Continuous Charge Distribution, cont • To find the total potential, you need to integrate to include the contributions from all the elements – This value for V uses the reference of V = 0 when P is infinitely far away from the charge distributions V for a Uniformly Charged Ring • P is located on the perpendicular central axis of the uniformly charged ring – The ring has a radius a and a total charge Q V Due to a Charged Conductor • Consider two points on the surface of the charged conductor as shown • is always perpendicular to to the displacement • Therefore, =0 • Therefore, the potential difference between A and B is also zero V Due to a Charged Conductor, cont • V is constant everywhere on the surface of a charged conductor in equilibrium V = 0 between any two points on the surface • The surface of any charged conductor in elect...
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This note was uploaded on 02/03/2010 for the course NEUROSCI 101A taught by Professor Scheibell during the Winter '10 term at UCLA.

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