Midterm1Notes

Midterm1Notes -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Skeletal Muscle and the Whole-Body Response to Muscular  Work 17:53 For most people, skeletal muscle constitutes about 40% of total body mass Single largest tissue group in body o Next largest (in sedentary groups) is adipose  Function: generate force and consequently create movement  Gross Structure Tendon is attached to bone Muscle is surrounded by fascia o Tough connective tissue that protects muscle from external trauma o Contains muscle as it contracts  Within the fascia are bundles of muscle fibers o Perimysium surrounds the fasicles  Endomysium  Cell Structure Outer membrane: sarcolemma  Groupings of myofilaments are known as myofibrils o Surrounded by the sarcoplasm, or interstitial fluid, of the cell  o Groupings of myofibrils create striated patterns of muscles  A myofibril is simply a series of sarcomeres that are attached by their  z-bands  Sarcomeres in series: when sarcomeres are all lined up end-to-end Hypertrophy: myofibrils get larger as sarcomeres are added in  parallel 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
* REVIEW BANDS OF SARCOMERES  Actin and myosin filaments overlap to provide dark appearance  of A-zone H-zone: no overlapping of filaments I-band: only thin (myosin) filaments Myosin heads are the force generating components of the  contractile unit  Optimal actin-myosin interaction Nuclei reside on the periphery right underneath the sarcolemma  o Multinucleated cells: need to be able to support protein synthesis  Sliding Filament Model of Muscular Contraction Muscle contracts by shortening of sarcomeres o As sarcomeres shorten the Z bands are drawn closer together o Since sarcomeres are linked in series for the length of the myofibril and  muscle fiber, the ends are drawn closer together, Sarcomeres shorten as the result of thin filaments “sliding” over thick  filaments. o Thick filaments are composed primarily of myosin with cross-bridges that  attach to actin molecules of the thin filaments.  o I-bands disappear  Actin-Myosin Interaction ATP binds to Myosin ATPase site o Myosin does nothing in the absence of ATP  ATP is hydrolyzed to ADP + Pi o Causes a release of energy (about 10 kcal/ mol of ATP) “Activated” myosin binds to actin
Background image of page 2
o Releases the phosphate  Pi is released resulting in a conformational change in Myosin o “Ratcheting”  The conformational change => movement of thin filament o “Power stroke”  ADP is released from the site and replaced by ATP  o Allows for the myosin head to be released from the actin  Crossbridge interaction does not occur in resting skeletal muscle because actin  and myosin are blocked by tropomyosin. The position of tropomyosin relative to the actin binding sites is determined by 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/03/2010 for the course EXSC 407AL at USC.

Page1 / 41

Midterm1Notes -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online