Midterm3Notes

Midterm3Notes - RenalPhysiology 17:57

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Renal Physiology 17:57 ‘Important Constituents of the Extracellular Fluid Sodium o Normal range: 128-146 mM o Non-lethal limits: 116-175 mM Potassium  o Normal range: 3.8-5 mM o Non-lethal limits: 1.5-9.0 mM Calcium o Normal range: 1.0-1.4 mM o Non-lethal limits: .5-2.0 mM Glucose o Normal range: 75-95 mg/dL o Non-lethal limits: 20-1500 mg/dL High tolerance on an acute basis, but not chronically  Bicarbonate: in the absence of CO2 this is not a good buffer  o Normal range: 24-32 mM o Non-lethal limits: 8-45 mM Chloride o Normal range: 103-112 mM o Non-lethal range: 70-130 mM
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Acid-base o Normal range: pH 7.3-7.4 o Non-lethal range: pH 6.9-8.0  Osmolality  o Normal range: 280-290 mOsm/kg  Critical for maintaining the fluid content  Introduction The function of the kidneys is regulation of the extracellular fluid (plasma and  tissue fluid) environment in the body. o This function is accomplished through the formation of urine, which is a  modified filtrate of plasma. In the process of urine formation, the kidneys regulate: o The volume of blood plasma This contributes significantly to the regulation of blood pressure o The concentration of waste products in the blood o The concentration of electrolytes (Na+, K+, HCO3- and other ions) in the  plasma o The pH of the plasma  The paired left and right kidneys are located in the abdominal cavity below the  diaphragm and the liver o Each kidney in an adult is: 135-175 g 10-12 cm long 5-6 cm wide o Urine is produced in the kidneys and is drained into a cavity known as the  renal pelvis and form there it is channeled via two long ducts to the ureters  to the single urinary bladder
Background image of page 2
o The renal pelvis represents the funnel-like dilated proximal part of the  ureter. It is the point of convergence of two or three major calices. Each renal papilla is surrounded by a branch of the renal pelvis called  a calyx. The major function of the renal pelvis is to act as a funnel for urine  flowing to the ureter.  o Each kidney contains many tiny tubules which empty into a cavity drained  by the ureter. Each of the tubules receives a blood filtrate from a capillary bed called  glomerulus. The filtrate is similar to plasma, but is modified as it passes through  different regions of the tubule and is thereby changed into urine.  The tubules and associated blood vessels thus form the functioning  units of the kidneys, which are known as nephrons.  Glomerular capsule= Bowman’s Capsule  Major Vascular Structures of the Kidney Renal arteries branch off of the descending aorta
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 35

Midterm3Notes - RenalPhysiology 17:57

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online