Naming Inorganic Compounds[1]

Naming Inorganic Compounds[1] - Naming Inorganic Compounds...

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Page 1 of 2 Naming Inorganic Compounds 1. Positive Ions (cations) a. Cations formed from single metal atoms (monoatomic ions) have the same name as the metal + “ion” [i.e., Na + = sodium ion; Zn 2+ = zinc ion] b. If a metal can form cations of differing charges, the positive charge is given by a Roman numeral in parentheses following the name of the metal [i.e., Fe 2+ = iron(II) ion; Fe 3+ = iron(III) ion] c. Cations formed from nonmetal atoms have names that end in “-ium” [i.e., NH 4 + = ammonium ion; H 3 O + = hydronium ion] 2. Negative Ions (anions) a. Monoatomic (one-atom) anions have names formed by replacing the ending of the name of the element with “-ide” [i.e., H - = hydride ion; O 2- = oxide ion] b. Polyatomic (many-atom) anions containing oxygen (oxyanions) have names ending in “-ate” or “-ite” i. “-ate” is for the more common oxyanion [i.e., NO 3 - = nitrate ion; SO 4 2- = sulfate ion] ii. “-ite” is for the oxyanion with the same charge as the common oxyanion but with one less oxygen [i.e., NO 2 - = nitrite ion; SO 3 2- = sulfite ion]
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Naming Inorganic Compounds[1] - Naming Inorganic Compounds...

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