dissanayake_belonging2 - Warning Concerning Copyright...

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Unformatted text preview: Warning Concerning Copyright Restrictions The Copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyright material. Under certain conditions specified in the law, libraries and archives are authorized to furnish a photocopy or other reproduction. One of these specified conditions is that the photocopy or reproduction not be "used for any purposes other than private study, scholarship, or research." If a user makes a request for, or later uses, a photocopy or reproduction for purposes in excess of "fair use," that user may be liable for copyright infringement. i~ T t~~ f l~ ~~ ~l ( ,:J'< .~ ,if ~ i~, i; ~~ '.1 ~~~ 'f ~; :~~ "I' ,j . , ;: ~ I.,"': ~ ;: '] .~! ,~~ OJ; I ~. If; ~i 1 :;- 2 Belonging HUM A N S ARE NOT biologically or psychologically prepared for being unloved and unwanted. Unlike bull elephants or orangutans and leopards of both sexes, which prefer to live entirely alone except for brief periods during which they mate (or, in the case offemale orangutans and leopards, have young), hominids have always required intimate coexistence with others of their kind. Mutuality with other individuals and belonging to a group are as necessary to human life as food and warmth. They are emo- tional food and warmth. As described in the previous chapter, we humans evolved to be lov- able and to attune ourselves to others from the moment we are born. From these tenaci;us roots of mother-infant mutuality grow our need and readi- ness to belong to a group. As it feels good to love and be loved in mutu- ality by another, it feels good to feel valued by and validated in a group. Just as important, not having these things feels bad, or worse than bad: incomplete. It is interesting that among social animals who care for their young- whether mammals, birds, or even insects-affective interchange usually occurs between adults as well (Eibl-Eibesfeldt 1989, 144), often in ritual- ized behaviors (like feeding one another, "billing and cooing," or making infantile sounds and movements) that are derived from infant care. In con- trast, iguanas (which, like most other reptiles, simply lay eggs and give no N 52 BELONGING a b In small-scale societies the world ovel; children easily engage in a larger social world of kin and other familiars. Photographs: I, Eibl- Eibesjeldt. a. Infant boy on older girl's shoulders solicits contact with a yMmg woman, who re- sponds, Eipo, !riall Jaya. b, Male greets il'ifant riding on. aI10thcr adt<lt's shoulders. Eipo, Irian Jaya. c. Year-old infant solicits contact fi'om adult female while'a YOfmger infant looks 0/1, Trobrial1d Islan.ds, Papua New Guinea, further thought to their offspring) are gregarious but not really sociable....
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2010 for the course C&I CI522 taught by Professor Liorabresler during the Fall '08 term at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

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dissanayake_belonging2 - Warning Concerning Copyright...

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