dissanayake_hands-on2 - Warning Concerning Copyright...

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Warning Concerning Copyright Restrictions The Copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyright material. Under certain conditions specified in the law, libraries and archives are authorized to furnish a photocopy or other reproduction. One of these specified conditions is that the photocopy or reproduction not be "used for any purposes other than private study, scholarship, or research." If a user makes a request for, or later uses, a photocopy or reproduction for purposes in excess of "fair use," that user may be liable for copyright infringement.
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4 ((Hands-On)) Competence W HEN A NEW B 0 R N baby is given to its mother for the first time, she nearly always takes or touches its tiny hand. Father, admiring relatives, and f~mily friends also seem to fmd it natural to insert a finger into the small fist, pick it up; and gently move it back and forth in welcome and kinship as if to say, "You are one of us." This gesture of taking or touching hands is reminiscent ofMichelan- gelo's depiction of the creation of Adam, showing the instant just before God bestows life upon his creature, the first human, by reaching out to touch his limp-and thus as yet useless-hand. The beauty of hands, even in repose, is in their latent mobility. Dancers must be as aware of their arms and hands as of their legs and feet, since the hand is so expressive- the tool of the soul as much as of the will. In choosing the adjective habilis ("handy" or "able") to designate the earliest fossil representative of the genus Homo, early paleoanthropologists acknowledged the importance of the hand and the crucial distinguishing capacity it bestowed-the ability to handle and make. Another name used sometimes to refer to our species was Homo jaber-the making or tool- making human. "-. -~ h_ For ;;}Uennia hands were the primary instruments for building and making the human way of life. Everything humanly relevant and recog- nizably human was made by human hands. To be huni.an was to make.
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100 "H A ND 5-=-0 N "CO MP ETEN CE Of the eight most conUllon verbs in the English language-~o, m~e, te, have, take, give, show, say-at least halfimply hand use. 1 - Just as belonging to a group predisposes us to learn the meaningful systems and stories of our fellows, it also prepares us to want to follow the example of our associates and learn to make things for our lives, Human brains and minds evolved to enable the learning of manual skills from oth- ers and the devising of practical solutions for the requirements of ancestral environments-to cope, "hands on," with the demands of life. Simply by doing what we were born to do evokes a sense-subliminal or fully felt-of competence, of being at home in the world, Such a sense is of- ten undeveloped in modern humans, because they inhabit a £refabricat~~ and electronic environment and pay others to provide their food, cloth- ing, iliclter, utensil;,~erything else.
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2010 for the course C&I CI522 taught by Professor Liorabresler during the Fall '08 term at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

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dissanayake_hands-on2 - Warning Concerning Copyright...

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