los alamus again - doi: 10.1098/rsta.2000.0717 , 131-149...

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Unformatted text preview: doi: 10.1098/rsta.2000.0717 , 131-149 359 2001 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. A Charles R. Farrar, Scott W. Doebling and David A. Nix based structural damage identification- Vibration Rapid response http://rsta.royalsocietypublishing.org/letters/submit/roypta;359/1778/131 Respond to this article Email alerting service here right-hand corner of the article or click Receive free email alerts when new articles cite this article - sign up in the box at the top http://rsta.royalsocietypublishing.org/subscriptions go to: Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. A To subscribe to This journal is 2001 The Royal Society on February 5, 2010 rsta.royalsocietypublishing.org Downloaded from 10.1098/rsta.2000.0717 Vibration-based structural damage identification By Charles R. Farrar, Scott W. Doebling and David A. Nix MS P-946, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA Many aerospace, civil and mechanical systems continue to be used despite ageing and the associated potential for damage accumulation. Therefore, the ability to monitor the structural health of these systems is becoming increasingly important. A wide variety of highly effective local non-destructive evaluation tools is available. However, damage identification based upon changes in vibration characteristics is one of the few methods that monitor changes in the structure on a global basis. A summary of developments in the field of global structural health monitoring that have taken place over the last thirty years is first presented. Vibration-based damage detection is a primary tool that is employed for this monitoring. Next, the process of vibration- based damage detection will be described as a problem in statistical pattern recogni- tion. This process is composed of three portions: (i) data acquisition and cleansing; (ii) feature selection and data compression; and (iii) statistical model development. Current research regarding feature selection and statistical model development will be emphasized with the application of this technology to a large-scale laboratory structure. Keywords: damage detection; structural health monitoring; statistical pattern recognition 1. Introduction In the most general terms, damage can be defined as changes introduced into a system that adversely affect the current or future performance of that system. Implicit in this definition is the concept that damage is not meaningful without a comparison between two different states of the system, one of which is assumed to represent the initial, and often undamaged, state. This discussion is focused on the study of damage identification in structural and mechanical systems. Therefore, the definition of damage will be limited to changes to the material and/or geometric properties of these systems, including changes to the boundary conditions and system connectivity, which adversely affect the current or future performance of the systems....
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los alamus again - doi: 10.1098/rsta.2000.0717 , 131-149...

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