BSC2010L - Actual Report 1 (Enzyme Kinetics)

BSC2010L - Actual Report 1 (Enzyme Kinetics) - William...

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- Enzyme Lowers Activation Energy (Ea) William Linkous Section: 0506, Page 1 Temperature and pH’s Effects on Enzyme Efficiency William Linkous February 21, 2008 Joysee Rodriguez BSC2010L, Section 0506
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William Linkous Section: 0506, Page 2 Abstract. Enzymes are proteins which work in the catalysis of biochemical reactions. Every enzyme has an optimal pH and temperature at which it performs best, which is the objective of this lab: to determine the optimal pH and temperature of a specific enzyme. In this experiment I used spectroscopy to analyze the rate at which the enzyme alpha-amylase uses up starch by testing absorbance. I found through utilization of reaction rate curves that it had an optimum temperature of 50 degrees C and an optimum pH of 4.75. This means that at this temperature and pH alpha-amylase is most efficient at lower activation energy and speeding up reactions. Introduction. Within the human anatomy one of the most important molecules are proteins. Some of their many functions include transferring information within cells, holding and communicating genetic information, speeding up reactions, and building up muscle tissue. One of their greatest is as enzymes which catalyze reactions by decreasing the activation energy for the reaction to occur. Under these circumstances not only is the reaction faster, but it uses less energy to get there which is shown in the Fig.(a) to the right. This is not constant, however, because every enzyme has a pH and Temperature at which it performs optimally. As Dr. Ajayi and Fagade (2007) observed in their bacillus species study, “Heat treatment at 70 degrees Celsius denatured
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William Linkous Section: 0506, Page 3 the beta -amylase component of the amylase source while alpha -amylase retained its potency at this temperature.” The denaturing which Dr. Ajayi and Fagade (2007) described happens to enzymes when they are put conditions which are too extreme compared to their optimum pH and temperature. The enzyme I used in this study was alpha-amylase whose optimum temperature and pH have been found before. Dr. Hulya et al. (2008) found such a value in their study of immobilizing alpha-amylase with Aspergillus sclerotiorum, “Optimum pH and temperature [of alpha-amylase] were found to be 5.0 and 40 degrees C, respectively, for both soluble and immobilized enzymes.” This is not necessarily the accepted value, but through experimentation these optimum states for enzymes can be determined. By discovering such optimum conditions for enzymes they can be put under such conditions to operate more efficiently, and it can be found which environments they will be denatured or even exist in. If alpha-amylase is placed under varying pH and temperature, I believe it will perform optimally at approximately 45 degrees C and 5.5 pH. This is because 45 degrees C is a slightly high temperature that would accelerate the reaction by increasing kinetic energy and collision frequency, but not denature it
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2010 for the course BSC 1454 taught by Professor Gregjones during the Spring '09 term at University of Florida.

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BSC2010L - Actual Report 1 (Enzyme Kinetics) - William...

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