Lecture%2020 - Lecture #20 Adaptation of Buddhism to...

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Lecture #20 Adaptation of Buddhism to Chinese Soil
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Age of Division 220-589
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Tang Dynasty 618-907
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The Arrival of Buddhism in China: Buddhism arrived in China during the first or second century CE by way of the northwest region of the country along the Silk Road. Buddhism also came to China along the sea route as early as the 2nd century CE. But the most important and constant contacts were made via the Silk Road.
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The Spread of Buddhism
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What Is Buddhism? Buddhism refers to the religion and philosophy which the teachings of Siddhartha Gautama (ca. 566-486 BCE) had produced. Siddartha was roughly a contemporary to Kongzi in China, and Socrates in Greece. Siddhartha Gautama’s clan name is Shakyamuni. He is revered in the Buddhist tradition as the Buddha, or the Awakened One. According to legends, Siddartha Gautama was born in a princely family in northern India, left it behind to become a wandering monk, and, after attaining enlightenment through meditation, established a tradition of monastic practice that became the basis of one of the great religions in the world. The Buddha’s passing away is known as parinirvana , the complete cessation of the process of rebirth.
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Huge Buddha at Yungang (c.490), about 45 feet tall. Some 51,000 Buddhist images are carved into the surface of a cliff, which extends over half a mile.
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Kongzi and Laozi
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The walls of cave 9 at Yungang, decorated with Buddha images surrounded by bodhisattvas, heavenly beings, musicians, and flying asparas.
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The walls of cave 428 at Dunhuang, depicting the grief of the Buddha’s disciples at his death (6 th century).
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Buddha’s Death amidst His Pupils.
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The Basic Doctrine in Buddhism: The Four Noble Truths Life (or the separate existence of an individual being) is bound up with suffering. Suffering originates from craving, desire, or attachment.
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2010 for the course ASIAN 361 taught by Professor Shuen-fulin during the Fall '09 term at University of Michigan.

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Lecture%2020 - Lecture #20 Adaptation of Buddhism to...

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