Lecture%2024 - Wang Hui (1632-1717), Qing Dynasty The Farm...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–15. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Tao Qian: The Farm as Utopia
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Idea of Utopia: A Good Place Need Not Be A Nowhere In Western cultures, “utopia” means “nowhere” and “a good place.” In other words, an ideal place is nowhere to be found. Tao Qian wrote “Peach Blossom Spring” to express his desire for an ideal world to live in. This is an agrarian utopia, modeled upon Chapter 80 of the Dao de jing . “Peach Blossom Spring” is not conceived as “nowhere.” Rather, it is somewhere in this world, deep in the mountains, isolated from us, but is still very much part of the world we live in. The writing of this utopian realm indicates that Tao Qian did not turn his back upon the world. He simply did not want to get involved in politics, in government service.
Background image of page 2
“Peach Blossom Spring” by Shi Tao (1642-1707), Qing Dynasty (1644-1911)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
“Peach Blossom Spring” by Wang Bing, Qing Dynasty
Background image of page 6
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 8
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 10
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 12
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 14
Background image of page 15
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Wang Hui (1632-1717), Qing Dynasty The Farm as Utopia: He wrote a fair amount of poems about his withdrawal from government service to return to his farm. He wrote a lot of this kind of poetry to justify his shunning public service in order to protect his integrity on the one hand, and also to talk about his choice of a more idealistic life on the other. Indeed, the farm is an utopia for Tao Qian. There are allusions in these poems to Chapter 80 of the Dao de jing . These poems illustrate the ideal life of simplicity, rusticity, and quiet pleasures of a scholar-farmer. On Returning to Dwell in the Country (pp. 52-57). I build my house near where others dwell (p. 66). On Reading the Classic of the Hills and Seas (pp. 99-100). The Homecoming by Li Gonglin (ca. 1041-1106), Song Dynasty (960-1279)...
View Full Document

Page1 / 15

Lecture%2024 - Wang Hui (1632-1717), Qing Dynasty The Farm...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 15. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online