Lecture-27 - Chem111 Fall, 2005 Lecture 27: Thermodynamics...

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Chem111 Fall, 2005 thermo-7 Let's continue talking about heat and work … We said last time that The heats measured at constant volume and constant pressures are given by q V = n c V Δ T q P = n c P Δ T These heats can be correlated with thermodynamic state functions: q V = Δ E q P = Δ H Recall that c V and c P are molar heat capacities … can we come up with some (easy) expressions for these? For an ideal gas, we also know that KE = n 3/2 RT (n = # moles of gas) If the gas is monoatomic (e.g. neon, helium, argon, etc.) then there is no other place for energy that we put into the system to go! It j u s t g o e s i n t o t h e kinetic energy of the particles, and so we can s a y t h a t Δ E = n 3/2 RT f – n 3/2 RT i = n 3/2 R Δ T Comparison to the above expression for q V shows that c V = 3/2 R Note: for gases that have more than one atom, c V > 3/2 R Lecture 27: Thermodynamics Heat and Work First Law of Thermodynamics
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Chem111 Fall, 2005 thermo-8 Let's look at our cylinder with a freely sliding piston again. This system starts out with
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2010 for the course CHEM 111 taught by Professor Kenney during the Spring '08 term at Case Western.

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Lecture-27 - Chem111 Fall, 2005 Lecture 27: Thermodynamics...

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