TroubleshootingAndUpgrading

TroubleshootingAndUpgrading - <?xml...

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<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd"> <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"> <head> <title>Troubleshooting And Upgrading Hardware</title> <meta name="copyright" content="Copyright &#169; 2008 by Martin B. Wolske" /> <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" media="screen, projection, print" href="http://www.w3.org/Talks/Tools/Slidy/slidy.css" /> <script src="http://www.w3.org/Talks/Tools/Slidy/slidy.js" charset="utf-8" type="text/javascript"></script> <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" media="screen, projection, print" href="http://www.w3.org/Talks/Tools/Slidy/w3c-blue2.css" /> </head> <body> <div class="background"> <img id="head-icon" alt="graphic with four colored squares" src="http://www.w3.org/Talks/Tools/Slidy/icon-blue.png" /> </div> <div class="slide cover"> <div style="text- align:center;width:60%;position:relative;left:20%;top:20%"> <h1> Troubleshooting and Upgrading Hardware<br /> LIS 451 * Summer 2008<br /> Introduction to Networked Information Systems<br /> </h1> <p> <a href="https://apps.lis.uiuc.edu/wiki/display/~mwolske/Martin+Wolske%2C+Ph.D."> Martin Wolske, Ph.D.</a> ( <a href="mailto:mwolske@uiuc.edu">mwolske@uiuc.edu</a>) </p> </div> </div> <div class="slide" id="RepresentingInfo"> <h1>Representing Information and Signals</h1> <ul> <li> <dfn>Analog</dfn>: information and signals are represented using a continuously variable physical quantity (think hands on a clock). Human senses process information as analog signals. </li> <li> <dfn>Digital</dfn>: information and signals are represented using discrete digits (think LCD clock). Computers deal with digital surrogates of the analog world. <ul> <li> <dfn>decimal</dfn>: a numeric system with 10 as its base, with distinct values between 0 and 9. We're most used to working in the decimal numbering system. <ul> <li>e.g., 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11. ..19,20,21. ..98,99,100</li> </ul>
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</li> <li> <dfn>binary</dfn>: a numeric system with 2 as its base, with distinct values of 0 and 1. Computers are most commonly implemented as digital machines using the binary numbering system. <ul> <li>e.g., 0,1,10,11,100</li> <li><dfn>bit</dfn>: a single binary digit</li> <li><dfn>byte</dfn>: 8 bits</li> </ul> </li> </ul> Why do you think humans use decimal and computers use binary? </li> </ul> </div> <div class="slide" id="ActivityBinary"> <h1>Activity: Binary</h1> <ul class="incremental"> <li>Overview: <ul> <li> The goal of this activity is to illustrate the basics of working with the binary numbering system. </li> <li> For the purpose of this example, when the smiley is face up, it is equivalent to a binary '1', and when the card is face down, it is equivalent to a binary '0'. Each card represents one 'bit'. Thus, with five cards, we have a 5-bit counter. </li>
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