INART 115 - INART 115: THE POPULAR ARTS IN AMERICA POPULAR...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
INART 115: THE POPULAR ARTS IN AMERICA - POPULAR MUSIC The Popular Music Forum: Assignment #1 A Position Paper on The Future of Popular Music. To be followed by a Response Paper NOTE: This assignment is to be a minimum of 500 words in length and due no later than 11:30 PM  on Wednesday, September 16, 2009.  The response paper is due no later than 11:30 PM on Friday,  September 18, 2009.  Post your position papers by clicking on "NEW POST" above (on the left).  Now, as in the past, technology is redefining how music is produced, marketed, and distributed.  This is  nothing new.  What is happening today has happened many times before.  Sheet music was replaced by  phonograph records, which, in turn, were replaced by audiotapes and CDs.  Now, mp3 files are replacing  audiotapes and CDs.  As the means of recording music changed, the marketing and distribution changed  and each change altered the very nature of the music industries.  And with each change came new methods of illegally copying and bootlegging written or recorded music.  However, this time there is a difference in both the scale of the change and in the response to it.  The  digital revolution is creating change on an unprecedented scale and that change is taking place very  rapidly.  It has made the production and especially the distribution of popular music faster, cheaper, and  easier than at any time in history.  Songs can be reduced to a simple code of 0s and 1s and sent  anywhere on earth in a matter of seconds.  Digital technologies have also made music piracy equally fast,  cheap, and easy with the resultant effect that more music is traded illegally over the Internet each day  than is legally sold in retail outlets…and the music industries have, so far, been unable to curb piracy  either through legal action or technological means.  For the music industries, this is a crisis of  monumental proportions that shows no sign of abating.  For popular music, this also may be a crisis of  monumental proportions because it threatens to undermine the most fundamental processes of the  marketplace.  For fans and consumers, this is a crisis of a different kind…one that raises important  questions about the future of popular music.  However, before attacking those questions, let's look at a little history…  A BRIEF HISTORY OF MUSIC DOWNLOADING The explosion of music downloading and Internet piracy began in the fall of 1999.  Shawn Fanning, a 19- year-old undergraduate at Northeastern University, launched the original Napster, which allowed computer  users to share and swap files, especially music, through a centralized file server.  It was a service that 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/09/2010 for the course INART 115 taught by Professor Web during the Spring '10 term at NY Film.

Page1 / 6

INART 115 - INART 115: THE POPULAR ARTS IN AMERICA POPULAR...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online