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CHE_106_Lecture9_2009

CHE_106_Lecture9_2009 - Chemistry 106 Lecture 9 Topics...

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Chemistry 106 Lecture 9 Topics: Solubility and Precipitation Reactions Chapter 4.1 –4.2
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EXAM 1 The First Exam will be held on Thursday October 1 at regular class time (3:30-4:50). The Exam will be held in two locations: Life Sciences Building (LSB) Room 001 Students with last names starting with A-F will meet in LSB. Gifford Auditorium (same as lecture) Students with last names starting with G-Z will meet in Gifford.
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Exam Details Exam #1 will cover Chapters 1 through 3. Primarily based on homework and lecture material. Exam will be multiple choice. You need to bring a #2 pencil. You need a calculator. You will be given a copy of the Periodic Table from the textbook. You will not be provided with any other information.
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Solutions Solutions are defined as homogeneous mixtures of two or more pure substances. The solvent is present in greatest abundance. All other substances are solutes . preparation of 0.250 L of 1.00 M solution of CuSO 4
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Ions in Aqueous Solution Ionic Theory of Solutions Many ionic compounds dissociate into independent ions when dissolved in water ) ( ) ( ) ( aq Cl aq Na s NaCl - + + H 2 O Those compounds that “freely” dissociate into independent ions in aqueous solution are called electrolytes. Their aqueous solutions are capable of conducting an electric current.
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When an ionic substance dissolves in water, the solvent pulls the individual Ions in Aqueous Solution Ionic Theory of Solutions ions from the crystal and solvates them. This process is called dissociation . Solution of NaCland water.
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Water as a Solvent Water is a very effective solvent for ionic compounds. Although water is an Solution of NaCland water. electrically neutral molecule, one end of the molecule (the O atom) is rich in electrons and has a partial negative charge, denoted by δ-.
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Motion of ions in solution is responsible for the conductivity of aqueous solutions.
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Testing Electrical Conductivity of a Solution (water + NaCl)
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Not all electrolytes are ionic compounds. Some molecular compounds dissociate into ions. ) aq ( Cl ) aq ( H ) aq ( HCl - + + Ions in Aqueous Solution Ionic Theory of Solutions The resulting solution is electrically conducting , and so we say that the molecular substance is an electrolyte .
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Some molecular compounds dissolve, but do not dissociate into ions. ) aq ( O H C ) glucose ( ) s ( O H C 6 12 6 O H 6 12 6 2 Ions in Aqueous Solution Ionic Theory of Solutions These compounds are referred to as nonelectrolytes. They dissolve in water to give a nonconducting solution.
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A nonelectrolyte may dissolve in water, but it does not dissociate into ions when it does so. Ions in Aqueous Solution Ionic Theory of Solutions This yields a nonconducting solution.
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