CHE_106_Lecture13_2009

CHE_106_Lecture13_2009 - Chemistry 106 Lecture 13 Topic:...

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Chemistry 106 Lecture 13 Topic: Light Waves/Photons Chapter 6.1-6.2
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Flame Tests of Group 1A Elements Flames of Sodium. Flames of Lithium.
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Emission (Line) Spectra of Some Elements
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Colored Flames from Several Metal Compounds. barium copper Metal compounds are used to color fireworks.
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The Wave Nature of Light A wave is a continuously repeating change or oscillation in matter or in a physical field. Light has wave characteristics. It consists of oscillations in electric and magnetic fields that travel through space. www.physast.uga.edu/~jss/1010/ch5/ovhd.html
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The Electromagnetic Spectrum Visible light, X rays, and radio waves are all forms of electromagnetic radiation .
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The Wave Nature of Light A wave can be characterized by its wavelength and frequency. – The wavelength, λ (lambda), is the distance between any two adjacent identical points of a wave.
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Relationship Between Wavelength and Frequency The frequency, ν (nu), of a wave is the number of wavelengths that pass a fixed point in one second . Hz = Hertz = s -1 = waves per second
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The Wave Nature of Light Multiplying the frequency, ν (waves/sec) and the wavelength, λ (m/waves) of a light wave gives the speed of the wave in m/s. – In a vacuum, the speed of light, c, is 299,792,458 m/s (~ 3.0 x 10 8 m/s). Therefore, – The speed of light is a constant (same for all wavelengths and frequencies). – So, given the frequency of light, its wavelength can be calculated, or vice versa. νλ = c
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The Electromagnetic Spectrum νλ = c
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The range of frequencies or wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation is called the electromagnetic (EM) spectrum . – Visible light extends from the violet end of the
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This note was uploaded on 02/09/2010 for the course CHE CHE 106 taught by Professor Korter during the Fall '09 term at Syracuse.

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CHE_106_Lecture13_2009 - Chemistry 106 Lecture 13 Topic:...

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