CHE_106_Lecture23_2009

CHE_106_Lecture23_2009 - Chemistry 106 Lecture 23 Topic Gas...

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Chemistry 106 Lecture 23 Topic: Gas Laws Chapter 10.1-10.5
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Announcements Exam #3 is on Thursday, December 3 Exam #3 covers Chapters 7, 8, and 9 Memorize Tables 9.1, 9.2, 9.3, and 9.4 The Exam will be held in two locations: h Life Sciences Building (LSB) Room 001 Students with last names starting with A-F will meet in LSB. h Gifford Auditorium (same as lecture) Students with last names starting with G-Z will meet in Gifford.
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Gas Laws In the first part of this chapter we will examine the quantitative relationships, or empirical laws , (ultimately the ideal gas law ) governing gases. ases have several characteristics that distinguish Gases have several characteristics that distinguish them from liquids and solids, but their compressibility is what we will talk about here. First, however, we need to understand the concept of pressure.
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Pressure and Units Pressure (P) is the force exerted per unit area of surface by molecules in motion (kinetic- molecular theory). P = Force/unit area SI Unit of pressure = pascal SI Unit of force = newton (N) 1 N = 1 kg∙m/s 2 – 1 pascal = 1 N/m 2 – 1 pascal = 1 kg/m∙s 2 – 1 atmosphere ( atm ) = 101,325 pascals – 1 atmosphere = 14.7 psi (pounds square inch) – 1 atmosphere = 760 mm Hg = 760 torr These particular values are all referred to as “ standard pressure ”.
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Atmospheric pressure at the earth’s surface comes from the force of gravity on a mass of air Atmospheric Pressure (such as a column). The pressure changes a bit with weather, but is approximately 101 kPa (1 atm).
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Barometers A barometer (with mercury as shown here) is used to measure the pressure of the mosphere. atmosphere. Atmospheric pressure pushes on the Hg in the base and forces the Hg in the column to a particular height. 760 mm
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Height of Liquid in Barometers P = g × d × h , where g = 9.81 m/s 2 Pressure = constant acceleration of avity ensity f liquid eight gravity × density of liquid × height Mercury reaches ~760 mm. Water reaches ~10300 mm.
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Boyle’s Law: The volume (V) of a sample of gas at a given temperature varies inversely with the applied pressure (P) . V
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This note was uploaded on 02/09/2010 for the course CHE CHE 106 taught by Professor Korter during the Fall '09 term at Syracuse.

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CHE_106_Lecture23_2009 - Chemistry 106 Lecture 23 Topic Gas...

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