CHE_106_Lecture24_2009

CHE_106_Lecture24_2009 - Chemistry 106 Lecture 24 Topics:...

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Chemistry 106 Lecture 24 Topics: Gas Laws Kinetic Molecular Theory Chapter 10.6-10.8 (skipping 10.9)
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Announcements Class Average for Exam #3 was 76%. FINAL Exam is on Tuesday, December 15. It will cover each chapter equally (or nearly). The Exam will be held in two locations: h Life Sciences Building (LSB) Room 001 Students with last names starting with A-F will meet in LSB. h Grant Auditorium (NOT Gifford) Students with last names starting with G-Z will meet in Grant.
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FINAL EXAM The exam will cover Chapters 1-10. There will be 30 questions with the same format as the hourly exams. Review Lecture Notes Review Exams 1-3 : (several of the questions will come directly from those exams) Review Homework : (some questions will come directly from the homework)
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The Ideal Gas Law The ideal gas equation , is usually expressed in the following form: nRT PV = P is pressure (in atm) V is volume (in liters) n is number of atoms (in moles) R is the universal gas constant 0.0821 L . atm/K . mol T is temperature (in Kelvin)
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Stoichiometry Problems Involving Gas Volumes ) g ( O 3 KCl(s) 2 (s) KClO 2 + • Consider the following reaction, which is often used to generate small quantities of oxygen. 2 3 • Suppose you heat 0.0100 mol of potassium chlorate, KClO 3 , in a test tube. How many liters of oxygen can you produce at 298 K and 1.02 atm?
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h First we must determine the number of moles of oxygen produced by the reaction. Question: How many liters of oxygen can you produce at 298 K and 1.02 atm from 0.0100 mol of KClO 3 ? Stoichiometry Problems Involving Gas Volumes 3 2 3 KClO mol 2 O mol 3 KClO mol 0100 . 0 × 2 O mol 50 01 . 0 =
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Now we can use the ideal gas equation to calculate the volume of oxygen under the conditions given. Stoichiometry Problems Involving Gas Volumes Question: How many liters of oxygen can you produce at 298 K and 1.02 atm from 0.0100 mol of KClO 3 ? P
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CHE_106_Lecture24_2009 - Chemistry 106 Lecture 24 Topics:...

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