Notes - Section 3.1-3.2

Notes Section - – Additional information is often added to the formulas in balanced equations to indicate the physical state of each reactant and

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Paul Jackman September 17, 2009 Chemistry CHE 106 – M029 Section 3.1-3.2 Notes 3.1 Chemical Equations Stoichiometry is the area of study that examines the quantities of substances consumed and produced in chemical reactions Atoms are neither created nor destroyed during any chemical reactions Chemical reactions are represented in a concise way by chemical equations The starting substances in a reaction are called reactants Substances in produced by the reaction are products When conditions are met, the equation is said to be balanced Balancing Equations Balance the equation by determining the coefficients that provide equal numbers of each type of atom on each side of the equation You should never change subscripts when balancing an equation Placing a coefficient in front of a formula changes only the amount of the substance and not its identity Indicating the States of Reactants and Products
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Unformatted text preview: – Additional information is often added to the formulas in balanced equations to indicate the physical state of each reactant and product 3.2 Some Simple Patterns of Chemical Reactivity Combination and Decomposition Reactions – In combination reactions two or more substances react to form one product – Ex. Magnesium metal burns in air to produce magnesium oxide, used in flares – In a decomposition reaction one substance undergoes a reaction to produce two or more other substances – Many compounds undergo decomposition reactions when heated Combustion in Air – Combustion reactions are rapid reactions that produce a flame – Most involve oxygen from air as a reactant – These reactions that involve intermediate steps are described as oxidation reactions instead of combustion reactions...
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This note was uploaded on 02/09/2010 for the course CHE CHE 106 taught by Professor Korter during the Fall '09 term at Syracuse.

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