8-26-09%20lecture_cell_def_prok_vs_eukB

8-26-09%20lecture_cell_def_prok_vs_eukB - What defines a...

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What defines a cell? A living organism? “All life is an experiment” Ralph Waldo Emerson “To live is so startling it leaves little time for anything else.” Emily Dickinson “He who has a why to live can bear almost any how.” Friedrich Nietzsche James Watson (left) and Francis Crick describing their model of DNA
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Announcements You should have received at least 1 email from me by now. Please tell me if you have not. The TAs and I will not be holding office hours this week, but please contact me if there’s something that you want to discuss. Scheduled hours starting next week. Lecture slides and audio from the first lecture are available on Blackboard. Slides and audio will usually be available by noon after each lecture (often earlier).
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Online quiz starting this Friday Will occur approximately weekly and will be through Blackboard All quiz grades averaged together will be equivalent to 20% of your grade Typically, quizzes will be available for 4-5 days after it becomes available. The first quiz will be available after class this Friday and will need to be completed before class on Wednesday.
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Summary of the analogies Cells are amazing machines composed of a large number of simpler, interacting components We can measure many of the components and their interactions We can describe the workings of the cell with mathematical models . Machines, Measurements, Models
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Cells were able to be described only when appropriate magnification (microscopes) became refined Left, simple microscope, Antony van Leeuwenhoek (~1660-70 AD) Middle, compound microscope, Robert Hooke (~1660-70 AD) Modern compound microscope, 20 th century Seventeenth century microscopes could magnify up to 200-250x (2 μ m) Modern light microscopes magnify up to 2000x (0.2 μ m resolution) Cork “cells”
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Cellular network: 1 mm Single cells: 20-100 microns Organelle: 1-2 microns Organelle components: 10-50 nm Molecular constituents of components: 5-50 Angstroms
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Levels of cellular organization Cellular network: 1 mm Single cells: 20-100 microns Organelle: 1-2 microns
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8-26-09%20lecture_cell_def_prok_vs_eukB - What defines a...

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