9-3-08_lectureA - The difference between school and life?...

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The difference between school and life? In school, you're taught a lesson and then given a test. In life, you're given a test that teaches you a lesson. -Tom Bodett Life is a source of infection -Van Halen…or virus philosophy?
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Online Quiz #1! Must be completed by noon today Questions 2 and 5 only allow one answer even though they say “Mark all that apply”. If you mark at least one of the one or more correct answers, you will get full credit. Answers will be given this evening. You must save each answer for them to count. You must submit the quiz before time expires. Time starts as soon as you click “Begin Assessment”. I will drop the lowest quiz grade during the semester.
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Endosymbiont theory of eukaryotic origin This is the idea that certain eukaryotic organelles (most notably mitochondria & chloroplasts) have evolved from smaller prokaryotic cells that had taken up residence in the cytoplasm of the larger host It was called the endosymbiont theory because it describes how a single composite cell of greater complexity can evolve from 2 or more separate, simpler cells living in a symbiotic relationship Mutually beneficial to both organisms http://www.gwu.edu/~darwin/BiSc151/Eukaryotes/Eukaryotes.html
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First, an anaerobic prokaryote or protoeukaryote engulfs an aerobic prokaryote
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Evolution in the form of plasma membrane invagination (infolding) led to compartmentalization
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Virus Structure At its simplest, a virus is just DNA or RNA with a protein coat. Many more complex variations on shape and life Example shown here is tobacco mosaic virus, a plant pathogen.
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From: Molecular Biology of the Cell , Third Edition, Alberts et al Simple viral life cycle 1) Bind and gain entry into cell 2) Uncoat capsid (protein coat) and if applicable, membranes, around DNA 3) Use viral DNA to alter host DNA such that viral DNA is replicated and mRNA needed to make viral proteins is transcribed 4) The duplicated viral DNA and translated viral proteins exit
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Lytic vs. lysogenic viral cycles
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This note was uploaded on 02/09/2010 for the course BIOL 230 taught by Professor Bartlett,e during the Fall '08 term at Purdue University.

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9-3-08_lectureA - The difference between school and life?...

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