Chapter 13 - M13_STAL6329_06_SE_C13.QXD 2/22/08 8:39 PM...

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P ART S IX T he number of deployed operating systems in embedded systems dwarfs the number deployed in personal computers and desktop computers. By that measure, embedded OSs constitute the most important category of OS. Em- bedded operating systems have their own unique requirements and design issues, which are explored in this part. ROAD MAP FOR PART SIX Chapter 13 Embedded Operating Systems Chapter 13 begins with an introduction to the nature of embedded systems and then goes on to look at key characteristics of embedded operating systems. The chapter then looks at two very different approaches to the design of embedded operating systems using two of the most widely used systems: eCos and TinyOS. Embedded Systems 601 M13_STAL6329_06_SE_C13.QXD 2/22/08 8:39 PM Page 601
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CHAPTER E MBEDDED O PERATING S YSTEMS 13.1 Embedded Systems 13.2 Characteristics of Embedded Operating Systems Adapting an Existing Commercial Operating System Purpose-Built Embedded Operating System 13.3 eCos Configurability eCos Components eCos Scheduler eCos Thread Synchronization 13.4 TinyOS Wireless Sensor Networks TinyOS Goals TinyOS Components TinyOS Scheduler Example Configuration TinyOS Resource Interface 13.5 Recommended Reading and Web Sites 13.6 Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems 602 M13_STAL6329_06_SE_C13.QXD 2/28/08 4:16 AM Page 602
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13.1 / EMBEDDED SYSTEMS 603 In this chapter, we examine one of the most important and widely used categories of operating systems: embedded operating systems. The embedded system environment places unique and demanding requirements on the OS and calls for design strategies quite different than that found in ordinary operating systems. We begin with an overview of the concept of embedded systems and then turn to an examination of the principles of embedded operating systems. Finally, this chapter surveys two very different approaches to embedded OS design. 13.1 EMBEDDED SYSTEMS The term embedded system refers to the use of electronics and software within a product, as opposed to a general-purpose computer, such as a laptop or desktop sys- tem.The following is a good general definition: 1 1 Michael Barr, Embedded Systems Glossary. Netrino Technical Library. http://www.netrino.com/Publications/ Glossary/index.php Embedded system. A combination of computer hardware and software, and per- haps additional mechanical or other parts, designed to perform a dedicated func- tion. In many cases, embedded systems are part of a larger system or product, as in the case of an antilock braking system in a car. Embedded systems far outnumber general-purpose computer systems, encom- passing a broad range of applications (Table 13.1). These systems have widely vary- ing requirements and constraints, such as the following [GRIM05]: Small to large systems, implying very different cost constraints, thus different needs for optimization and reuse Relaxed to very strict requirements and combinations of different quality re- quirements, for example, with respect to safety, reliability, real-time, flexibility,
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This note was uploaded on 02/10/2010 for the course EXTC 56 taught by Professor Stalling during the Spring '10 term at Abu Dhabi University.

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Chapter 13 - M13_STAL6329_06_SE_C13.QXD 2/22/08 8:39 PM...

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