Lecture23_RandomProcess

Lecture23_RandomProcess - o = -0.35. At 5% level of...

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ECE 340 Probabilistic Methods in Engineering M/W 3-4:15 Prof. Vince Calhoun Prof. Vince Calhoun Lecture 23: Random Processes Lecture 23: Random Processes
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FYI • Presentations, Wednesday. •R e v i e w • May 12---Monday------3:00 pm to 5:00 pm--- DSH 120 •F i n a l • May 14---Wednesday---3:00 pm to 5:00 pm--- DSH 324
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Decision Making for Two Samples • So far we talked about making inferences about the population parameter(s) when dealing with only one population at a time. •S u p p o s e w e a s k : • Is the new method of assembling a product better than the existing one? • Is there any difference between workers in two assembly plant? • How do we answer these scientifically? Using statistical methods for two-population case.
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Inference for a difference in the means Under the assumption listed earlier, we have the following result.
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Test of hypotheses
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Confidence Interval
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Variance unknown:
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Verify that the pooled standard deviation, s p = 2.7 and the test statistic value is, t
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Unformatted text preview: o = -0.35. At 5% level of significance, we do not reject the null hypothesis and conclude that there is no sufficient evidence to say the means of the two catalysts differ. Dependent Populations Pairwise test So far, we assumed the populations under study to be independent. What happens when we need to compare, say, two assembling methods using the same set of operators? Obviously, the populations are not independent. So, what do we do? Verify that the calculated value of the statistic is 6.05. Since this value is greater than the table value at 5% level, we reject the null hypothesis and conclude at 5% level that there is sufficient evidence to say that Karlsruhe method produces more strength on the average than the Lehigh method. Verify that 90% confidence interval for the difference in the means is given by (-4.79, 7.21)....
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This note was uploaded on 02/10/2010 for the course TBE 2300 taught by Professor Cudeback during the Spring '10 term at Webber.

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Lecture23_RandomProcess - o = -0.35. At 5% level of...

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