Lecture 1 Intro

Lecture 1 Intro - today… introduce course personnel how...

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Unformatted text preview: today… introduce course personnel how to contact us office hours course logistics textbook, readings exams, grading website, lecture notes, podcasts first lecture course goals organ systems, cell types Recommended reading: Sherwood Chapter 1 (both editions) WELCOME TO NPB 101 - SYSTEMIC PHYSIOLOGY! Fig 1-4 We are able to enjoy healthy lives because we have ensembles of cells (“organ systems”) that perform functions critical for survival. To learn how we survive, let’s examine the structure & function of these organ systems. Look around you. Notice that terrestrial vertebrates are collections of cells on dry land. w w w . b l u e p l a n e t b i o m e s . o r g As evolutionary biologists and ecologists, you might ask “why?” For example, if this primate took several days to walk across the landscape shown here, what problems would it face & how will it solve these problems? As physiologists, we will spend this quarter asking “how”? That is, what structures & functions of its body enable it to survive? Loris tardigradus www.smh.com.au/.../2006/06/27/1151174196706 To begin with, the concentration of water in the air is less than inside us. To estimate this, compare the H 2 O inside an average person vs. the H 2 O in air even on a humid day Since air is so much “drier”, we tend to lose water. To avoid dehydration-- we must balance fluid intake versus fluid loss . Sherwood (7th ed) Table 15-1 Schmidt-Nielsen (5th ed), Table 1.2 www.cfscapecod.com temperature water vapor o C mm Hg mg per liter of air 10 9.2 9.4 20 17.5 17.3 30 31.7 30.3 Our bodies contain ~ 670,000 mg per liter (assuming the volume of a human body is 0.9 liter per kg). Problem: our bodies do not manufacture chemical elements (e.g. Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, C, H, O, N, P...) Solution: We must acquire the ones we need. Next, recall that our bodies contain a wide variety of chemicals, ranging from free inorganic ions to enormous organic (carbon-containing) molecules (for review, see Sherwood, Appendices B & C, pp. A-3 thru A-31) Examples: 1) Na + to help move material across membranes in kidney (during urine formation) and small intestine (during digestion)...
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This note was uploaded on 02/10/2010 for the course BIO NPB taught by Professor Furlow during the Spring '10 term at UC Davis.

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Lecture 1 Intro - today… introduce course personnel how...

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