7-2 unsolved.docx - leveland Clinic's move to implement Servant Leadership In your opinion what do you find most compelling in the problems faced by

7-2 unsolved.docx - leveland Clinic's move to implement...

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leveland Clinic's move to implement Servant Leadership. In your opinion what do you find most compelling, in the problems faced by Cleveland Clinic and the solutions and strategies they applied. The Ellikar article should be used as a backdrop to discuss some of the deeper obstacles that the leadership of Cleveland Clinic most likely faced as they were implementing a radical overhaul of their organization. Servant leadership is a concept that has gained increased notice within modern organizations. Its premise, as described over the last quarter century, was revived largely due to the writings of Robert Greenleaf (1977, 1998), which premised a servant first attitude, the raising of other servant leaders, and the potential impact on society. Considerable attention since has been devoted to attributes, measurements, and impact of servant leaders. Yet the servant leader may not be as welcome within organizations as we might first postulate. There is potential for significant differences and conflict between organizations and servant leaders. The intent of this article is to explore potential differences, and potential resolution strategies. The form of the modern organization has gone through a number of transformations, including scientific management, mass industrialization, management science as a discipline, six sigma quality movement, significant empowerment efforts, the rise of the computer and the information age, the proliferation of the network age, and most recently the early rise of bottom up organic organizations. Yet, it in every era of organizational transformation the tension between organizational pressures and human dynamics does not seem to have lessened. Warner (2007) humorously highlights one of Franz Kafka's (1883-1924) unfinished manuscripts, called The Castle (1926), that told the story of a land surveyor who was hired to assist a small town and its castle baron. In a telling moment, the Superintendent says "'You have been taken on as a Land Surveyor, as you say, but unfortunately we have no need of a Land Surveyor'" (p. 1025). Warner highlights that "arbitrary authority reduces the individual to uncomprehending powerlessness." (p. 1024). This fictional narrative from almost a century ago hints at the frustrating paradox of bureaucracies that is experienced today within organizations. Similarly, Warner notes that Max Weber (1864- 1920), considered a foundational early writer on organizations, saw the dependence of organizations on a rationality that reduced members to feeling like a part of a machine, yet who in turn want to become a bigger part of that machine. Weber noted (1978) "the [audience's] passion for bureaucratization drives us to despair" (p. 1024). It would appear that an organization's drive to organize alienates the very people it is organizing. In the middle of the 20th century, efforts in leadership theory were aimed at creating an ideal approach that balances organizational drive with individual needs. These efforts included the optimized "9-9 manager" (Blake and
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