Lecture 4 - Economics and Demography The Health and Mortality Transition Week 4 The Health and Mortality Transition Outline P P P P P P Defining

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Economics and Demography The Health and Mortality Transition Week 4
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P Defining the Health and Mortality Transition P Life Span And Longevity P Disease and Death Over the Life Cycle P Causes Of Poor Health and Death P Measuring Mortality P Health and Mortality Inequalities The Health and Mortality Transition Outline
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P Health and death are two sides of morbidity and mortality. P Morbidity refers to the prevalence of disease in a population. (What is the distinction between incidence and prevalence ? ) P Mortality refers to the pattern of death. P The health and mortality transition refers to the shift from prevailing poor health and high death rates from infectious diseases occurring especially among the young, to prevailing good health and low deaths rates from infectious diseases, with most people dying at older ages from degenerative diseases. The Health and Mortality Transition
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P For virtually all of human history, early death was commonplace. P Improved health has been the primary factor in increasing life expectancy. P As a result, the variability by age in mortality is compressed, leading to an increased rectangularization of mortality. P This means most people survive to an advanced age and die fairly quickly. P The changes brought about as people survive to ever older ages are important contributions to the demographic transition. The Health and Mortality Transition Health and Mortality Changes Over Time
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P For most of humanities time on earth, life expectancy fluctuated between 20 and 30 years. P About 2/3 of babies survived to their first birthday, and about 1/2 were still alive at age five. P At the other end of the age continuum, around 10% of people made it to age 65 in a premodern society. The Health and Mortality Transition Health and Mortality Changes Over Time
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P Life expectancy in the Roman era is estimated to have been 22 years. P People who reached adulthood were not too likely to reach a very advanced age. P The plague, or Black Death, hit Europe in the fourteenth century, having spread west from Asia. P It is estimated that 1/3 of the population of Europe may have perished from the disease between 1346 and 1350. The Health and Mortality Transition The Pre Modern Era
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P Refers to the diseases that Columbus and other European explorers took to the Americas. P Their immunity to the diseases they brought, compared with the devastation the diseases wrought on indigenous populations, is one explanation for the relative ease with which Spain dominated Latin America after arriving there around 1500. P
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This note was uploaded on 02/11/2010 for the course ECONOMICS EC236 taught by Professor Paul during the Winter '10 term at Wilfred Laurier University .

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Lecture 4 - Economics and Demography The Health and Mortality Transition Week 4 The Health and Mortality Transition Outline P P P P P P Defining

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