High Speed Ground Transportation - Planning and Design Issues

High Speed Ground Transportation - Planning and Design Issues

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© 2003 by CRC Press LLC 60 High-Speed Ground Transportation: Planning and Design Issues 60.1 Introduction Purpose • Scope • Brief History 60.2 Systems and Planning Issues Market Demand • Corridor Development • Cost Estimate • Schedule Performance • Safety • Noise • Ride Quality • Energy Conversion Efficiency • System-Wide Parameters • Air–Rail Combination Capabilities 60.3 Train Set Specifications 60.4 Infrastructure Specifications and Design Geometric Design • Track and Ties • Ballast–Subgrade • Catenary 60.5 Track–Train Interactions Using Existing ROW • Tilt Trains • Train–Track Dynamics 60.6 HSR Examples Worldwide Introduction • United States: The ACELA Express • France: The TGV • Germany: The ICE • Japan: The Shinkansen (Bullet Train) • Other Examples 60.7 Magnetic Levitation Technology 60.8 Conclusions 60.1 Introduction Purpose High-speed ground transportation (HSGT) refers to rail services that use appropriate technology that allows trains to operate at speeds over 200 kph (125 mph) in revenue service. This technology consists of trains, track, and other necessary equipment. There are two major types of technology used to achieve such speeds: •T rains that operate using steel-wheel-on-steel-rail technology and are powered by either electric or diesel locomotives. These are called high-speed rail (HSR) trains. rains that are suspended (levitated) and propelled with the use of magnetic fields (magnetic levitated (MAGLEV) trains). Robert K. Whitford Purdue University Matthew Karlaftis National Technical University of Athens Konstantinos Kepaptsoglou National Technical University of Athens
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The technology available allows HSR trains to operate at 300 to 400 kph (186 to 250 mph). Such trains have been successful in revenue service in France (the Train Grande Vittese (TGV)), Germany (the Intercity Express (ICE)), Japan (the bullet trains — Shinkansen), and other countries for several years. For example, Japanese HSR trains have been operating since 1965 and French TGVs since 1981. On the other hand, MAGLEV trains have been a promising still-experimental technology for many years and are expected to be operating in the near future. There are two major MAGLEV types — Transrapid of German FIGURE 60.1 The first Japanese bullet train, Shinkansen 0. (From Fosset, D.A.J., 1998.) FIGURE 60.2 The Japanese HSGT network. (From Fosset, D.A.J., 2001.) © 2003 by CRC Press LLC
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origin and MLU of Japanese origin — operating experimentally and accommodating small routes. MAGLEV technology is implemented at the moment to connect the Shanghai airport with the city of Shanghai in China. There are also plans of using such technology to connect Shanghai with Beijing [1]. Further, the United States is still remaining skeptical in applying or developing such technology, either HSR or MAGLEV, so a great part of this chapter will be devoted to the planning and systems issues associated with implementing this technology in the United States. Despite that fact, agencies such as the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Transportation Research Board (TRB), and U.S. Department
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This note was uploaded on 02/11/2010 for the course ENGR CIVE 402 taught by Professor Thorton during the Spring '10 term at Colorado State.

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High Speed Ground Transportation - Planning and Design Issues

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