reasons for not getting job

reasons for not getting job - You're not getting the job -...

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You're not getting the job -- 25 reasons why Story Highlights The economy, your location, industry trends can all influence your job status Don't forget the common denominator in your job hunt is you Your résumé should build a case for you to be hired for a specific position Don't beat yourself up over a flubbed interview -- but be sure to learn from mistakes Next Article in Living » By Anthony Balderrama Editor's note: CNN.com has a business partnership with CareerBuilder.com, which serves as the exclusive provider of job listings and services to CNN.com. When you're job hunting, you can go mad if you think about the amount of factors beyond your control that affect your chances of getting hired. Leaving a trail of angry bosses or co-workers will come back to haunt you when you need references. The economy, your location, industry trends -- even the hiring manager's mood -- can influence whether or not you get a job.
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Still, as nice as it would be to blame your lack of offers on external factors, you can't forget that common denominator in your job hunt -- from the résumé to the interview -- is you. Here are 25 ways you might be unknowingly sabotaging your own job search: The first steps 1. Not keeping track of your accomplishments When you're happy with your job, it's easy to forget about possible future job hunts. You never know when you'll end up looking for new work, and if you don't keep a running list of awards, promotions and accomplishments, you might not remember them when it's time to update your résumé. 2. Leaving on a bad note As much fun as it is to fantasize about telling off a bad boss, don't actually do it. Leaving a trail of angry bosses or co-workers will come back to haunt you when you need references. Don't Miss Making the most of your summer job Top ten summer jobs More CareerBuilder.com stories 3. Not networking If you're silent about your job search, your friends, family and colleagues won't think of you when they hear about job opportunities. 4. Only using the Internet Online job boards are fantastic resources, but you need to do some footwork if you want to increase your chances of finding a job. Contact companies whom you'd like to work for, even if there are no job listings. Not all companies advertise openings online. 5. Only searching for the perfect job Yes, your job search should be focused. After all, applying to every job posting that comes your way is a good way to waste time but not an effective way to find a job you want. However, if you approach your job hunt unwilling to accept anything less than the precise job title, pay, vacation time and hours you want, you're setting yourself up for disappointment.
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The résumé and cover letter 6. Writing a generic cover letter If your cover letter looks like it could have come from a word processor template, right down to the "To Whom It May Concern," don't bother sending it. Hiring managers look
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This note was uploaded on 02/11/2010 for the course ACC 305 taught by Professor Allen during the Spring '10 term at Wake Forest.

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reasons for not getting job - You're not getting the job -...

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