Lecture 17 - Lecture 17 The Japanese in the U.S (1888-1924)...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 17 The Japanese in the U.S (1888-1924) • Japan was seen as a strong state and rising nation - Not r e g ul a t e d a s c olo n, a s Philippin e s a n d Chin a h a d - Fou g h t in n u m e r o u s w a r s, inclu din g o n e a g ai n s t Pru s si a C a t h olic mi s sio n a ri e s a rriv e d in Jap a n in 1 8 4 3 <Tok u g a w a p e rio d (1 6 0 0-1 8 6 8) > - Per s e c u tio n of Jap a n e s e Chris ti a n s - Jap a n s o u g h t t o isol a t e its elf fro m for eig n influ e n c e s - Policie s a n d d e cr e e s p a s s e d t o limit Chris ti a nity a n d For eig n influ e n c e in J ap a n for 2. 5 c e n t u ri e s - 1 8 5 3 Co m m o d or e Perry e n d s Jap a n’s isol a tio n (f e a r t h a t Jap a n will b e c o m e a p olitic al c olo ny) - N e g o ti a t e d tr a d e a gr e e m e n t s wit h o t h e r w e s t e r n p o w e r s t o o p e n u p Jap a n < M eiji Res t or a tio n (1 8 6 8) > - Aim e d for a s tro n g e r s t a t e u sin g e m piric al r ul e - Meiji le a d e r s pro p o s e d n e w la n d t a x a tio n o H a d t o p a y t a x d urin g g o o d a n d b a d far min g y e a r s - So u g h t r a pid ind u s tri aliz a tio n of s t a t e - 1 8 8 7, 3 7 0 , 0 0 0 far m e r s los s t h eir la n d d u e t o in a bility t o p a y la n d t a x - 1 8 9 0, 4 0 % of far m e r s b e c a m e t e n a n t far m e r s - E migr a tio n fro m Jap a n o c c urr e d in s el e c t loc al e s of Jap a n, n o t n e c e s s a rily i n t h e p o or e s t r e gio n s - - Ken = pr e-v e c t or of Jap a n o So u t h w e s t Jap a n h a s c o n c e n tr a t e d a r e a s of Jap a n e s e im migr a tio n t o H aw aii a n d Philippin e s o Hiros hi m a , Yam a g u c hi, Fukuok a, N a g a s a ki Irwin Co nv e n tio n r e s p o n sibl e for findin g la b or for H aw aii o Rob er t Walk er Irwin r e cr uit e d Jap a n e s e t o w ork o n s u g a r pl a n t a tio n s i n H aw aii Priv a t e c o m p a ni e s w er e in c h ar g e of la b or c o n tr a c t s, b u t Jap a n g o v er n m e n t c o n trolle d a c tiviti e s of t h e s e c o m p a ni e s Mos t of e mi gr a t e d Jap a n e s e w er e n o t p e a s a n t s b u t far m e r s o S e c o n d-s o n s w er e t h e m ajority d u e t o t h e fac t t h a t t h e y w o uld n o t i nh e rit t h e fa t h e r’s la n d 1 8 9 0, 2 5, 0 0 0 Jap a n e s e im mi gr a t e d t o U.S, h alf in CA 1 9 0 1-1 9 0 8, 1 2 5, 0 0 0 Jap a n e s e im mi gr a t e d t o U.S o Pe ak r a t e of im mi gr a tio n “S t u d e n t la b or er s” o So n s of s m all far m e r s a n d mi d dl e w a g e w ork er s - - o Between ages of 15-25 o Hoped to return to Japan for govern ment positions o Forced to work as do mestic servants to pay off fees Due to Anti – Chinese mo ve men t, Japanese could not occupy same p ositions as Chinese o Entered railroad maintenance, wood workers brokers 1910, 18,000 Japanese worked as do mestic servants for high-class white h ouses o Also identified with gardening o Also entered retail marketing and flowers, and later on agricultural p roduce o Entered fishing industry Japanese merchants not only served food stuff to other Japanese, bu t also c atered to whites interested in Japanese goods such as silk Tanomoshi – Ko o “Rotating credit association ” o Groups of friends combine their savings and share its usage 1919, CA had 70,000 Japanese o Half of population involved in agriculture 1905, media start planting seed of fear towards Japan ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/12/2010 for the course ASAMST 20A taught by Professor Omi during the Fall '08 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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