ISE 440 presentation

ISE 440 presentation - CHAPTER 3 The Rise of Lean Production

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Click to edit Master subtitle style  2/13/10 CHAPTER 3 “The Rise of Lean Production” ISE 440 Sam Kim, Ryan Sanders, Kari Wong, Jon Yu
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 2/13/10 I. Story of the Toyoda Family II. The Founders of Lean Production III. The Company and Plant IV. V. Consumers in a Lean System Outline
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 2/13/10 Year: 1929 Kiichiro Toyoda Toyoda family was successful in textile manufacturing Founded Toyota Motor Company in 1937 Resigned in 1949 1st Toyoda Visits Ford’s Rouge
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 2/13/10 Year: 1950 Eiji Toyoda Nephew of Kiichiro Studied 90 days, returned to Nagoya Taiichi Ohno Said OH NO, mass production will not work in Japan 2nd Toyoda Visits Ford’s Rouge
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 2/13/10 Domestic market was small and wanted range of vehicles Problems for Toyota in Japan
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 2/13/10 The post-war workforce was empowered by American occupation Problems for Toyota in Japan
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 2/13/10 Economy was starved for capital and foreign exchange Car companies in other countries wanted to expand into Japan Problems for Toyota in Japan
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 2/13/10 Japan prohibited direct foreign investment in the Japanese auto industry, tried to force Toyota to specialize in only one type of car Mass production required huge production to be economical Problems for Toyota in Japan
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 2/13/10 Simple die-change techniques Die changes went from 1 day to 3 minutes Eliminated need for die specialists and gave skills to workers Taiichi Ohno’s Great Idea
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 2/13/10 More efficient to produce smaller batches at a time Less inventory Stamping mistakes showed up almost instantly Eliminated waste of large numbers of defective parts Gave skills to the workforce they didn’t have before Results of Quick Die Changes
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 2/13/10 Macroeconomic problems Firing Workforce Company’s Union Balance of Power ¼ Workforce fired Beginning Struggle
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 2/13/10 1. Lifetime Employment Guarantees
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Workers became members of Toyota community. Full set of Rights and
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This note was uploaded on 02/12/2010 for the course ISE 440 taught by Professor Rahimi during the Spring '09 term at USC.

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ISE 440 presentation - CHAPTER 3 The Rise of Lean Production

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