Human Body Diagram - Grastrointestinal(GI Tract and...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Grastrointestinal (GI) Tract and Accessory Digestive Organs- Salivary glands Oral cavity . ' " ' Esoehagus Liver Lower esophageal sphincter Diaphragm Stomach Pancreas f Gallbladder Small intestine I I Large Intestine Ascending colon Transverse colon Descending colon Sigmoid colon Rectum / . Anus From: Wardlaw, G. M., Insel, P. M., and Seyler, M. F. 1994. Contemporary Nutrition, 2nd Ed. Mosby, St. Louis, MO., pg. 102. Human Blood Circulatory System Blood su l to head angfiigper body Blood supply to lungs Body cells extract oxygen and nutrients from arterial blood at the capillary beds and release carbon dioxide . and waste products into venous blood. In the lungs blood picks up oxy en and then returns to the eart. The right side of the heart accepts venous1 bloold and um s it into t e u mona gircu‘it. The lelt sidae oi the ry heart pumps oxy enated blood to body ce 5. Heart Oxygen-rich arterial blood leaves the left side of the heart, destined tor body cells. Arterial blood Venous blood has less oxy en and more carbon dioxide t on ' arterial blood. Venous blood is destined tor the right side of the heart. Venous blood In the small intestine, arterial blood donates oxy en and nutrients to cells. e venous blood that exits the capillary beds contains absorbed nutrients and travels via the portal vein to the liver. Liver Intestine Lymph trom the intestinal capillary bed collects into a lar e duct that in turn connects to are bloodstream. Lymph Body cells extract oxygen and nutrients From arterial blood at the capillary beds and release carbon dioxide and waste products into venous blood. The ortal vein accepts water- soluble products absorbed by the intestinal capillary beds and transfers these to the liver. Portal vei n Blood supply to pelvis and lower extremities Cells in tissue Blood in artery Venule (From heart) L Smooth muscle surrounding artery Lymph Blood in capillaries vessel (lacteal) Fluid between cells - (interstitial Huid) Figure 4-2 Blood circulation throughout the body. This represents the route blood takes through the two circuits that begin and end at the heart. The red color indicates blood that is richer in oxy- gen; blue is for blood carrying more carbon dioxide. Oxygen and nutrients are exchanged for carbon dioxide and waste products in the capillaries, the points at which the arteries and veins merge. The bottom box shows a close up of a capillary bed in the small intestine, including the location of the lymphatic vessels. This second set of circulatory vessels—part of the lymphatic system—picks up fluid that builds up between cells (interstitial fluid) and large particles, such as some fats. This fluid and the particles become lymph, which travels through further lymph vessels to reach the blood- stream. Lymph vessels in the intestine are also called iacteals. From: Wardlaw, G. M. 1997. Contemporary Nutrition, 3rd Ed. Brown & Benchmark, Madison, WI, pg. 115 ...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern