Chapter 6b - JenniferRosner Psychology201 February23,2007...

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Jennifer Rosner Psychology 201 February 23, 2007 Emily Grijalva September 30th, 2009
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Things to keep in mind… Midterm exam : Thursday, Oct 8 th 7-9 pm Natural History Building, Room 228 You do have class on Friday, Oct 9th.
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Today   How do Attitudes Form? Affective Sources Cognitive Sources Behavioral Sources Physiological Processes and Attitudes   Attitudes Across the Life Span The Effects of Early Experiences on Attitudes Do We Become More Conservative as We Age?   How do Attitudes Affect Behavior? Rational Choice Selective Perception   When do Attitudes Predict Behavior?   Culture and Attitudes Cross-Cultural Commonalities in Attitudes
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Measurement Technique Key Features Advantages & Disadvantages Likert Scale •Agreement/ Disagreement All statements clearly favorable/ unfavorable •Researcher must identify non- valid items and eliminate • Easy to construct • Clear and simple to answer • Reliable scores Thurstone Scale • Respondent indicates agreement with items Items include favorable, neutral, and unfavorable • Score is based on those items agreed with • More complex to construct Semantic Differential Scale • Respondent rates attitude object on evaluative dimension All dimensions reflect good-bad dimension • Score is sum of ratings • Simple to construct • Clear and simple to answer •Very direct measure of evaluations Opinion Survey • Respondent answers yes just one/two items each issue Response yes/undecided/no • Sometimes obtain representative sample • Simple to construct • Useful gathering info about public opinion • Usually not detailed enough for use in psychology
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Person endorses item if her standing on the latent trait, theta, is more extreme than that of the item . 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 Theta Prob of Positive Response Item Person A Dominance Response Process
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Person endorses item if his standing on the latent trait, theta, is near that of the item . “I think that traveling to other countries is okay”. Disagree if either hate to travel or love to travel Example IRF for Ideal Point  Process 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 -3.0 -2.5 -2.0 -1.5 -1.0 -0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Theta Person Loves Person Hates Item
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Review Explicit vs. Implicit Attitudes (IAT) http://www.youtube.com
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Physiological Processes and Attitudes  ATTITUDE HERITABILITY –  to what extent do we inherit our  attitudes?  We  DO NOT  inherit attitudes directly o  if your parents like sports, you do not inherit the “favorable sport gene”  We  DO  inherit characteristics that predispose us to certain attitudes o  strength and coordination from parents makes it  more likely
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This note was uploaded on 02/12/2010 for the course PSYCH 100 taught by Professor Suarez during the Fall '09 term at University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.

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Chapter 6b - JenniferRosner Psychology201 February23,2007...

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