chpt4 - February12,2009 Quiz2 Friday,September18,2009...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
February 12, 2009
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Quiz 2 Friday, September 18, 2009 Chapters 3 and 4 15 multiple choice questions appointment Office: 237 Psychology Bldg. Feel free to email me with questions, too.
Background image of page 2
Overview  What We See in Others: Social Perception Attribution Theories: Explaining Social Behavior The Correspondence Bias: A Fundamental Attribution Error Beyond Words: Nonverbal Behavior Gender and Cultural Differences in Nonverbal Behavior  What we See in Ourselves: Self-Perception The Looking Glass Self Social Comparison Developmental Changes Across the Life Span in Social Comparison Self-Perception Theory
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
What We See in Others Social perception: the study of how we form impressions  of and make inferences about other people We need to predict others’ actions reasonably well in order to  cope effectively in a social world and control our environment How do we predict what others will do? (1) Need to understand  why  they acted the way they did;  what can these actions  allow us to infer  about their person? (2)  Need to understand how various  external/situational  factors   influenced these actions (e.g., money, norms, laws) … These two needs lead us into the domain of attribution  theories
Background image of page 4
 ATTRIBUTIONS : causal judgments about why an event or  behavior occurred  what judgments we make about another person’s behavior  influences how we behave toward him/her  ATTRIBUTION THEORIES : models that attempt to delineate  the processes underlying causal judgment Internal vs. external attributions We behave as intuitive scientists who try to make  causal judgments in a rational, scientific manner
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Kelley’s Covariation Model of Attribution  COVARIATION MODEL OF ATTRIBUTION : we make causal judgments by determining whether a particular  behavior correlated with a person, a situation, or some  combination of persons and situations In other words: When explaining others’ behaviors, we look for covariations  (similarities, consistencies, correlations) across a range of  situations to help us narrow down specific attributions 
Background image of page 6
Example of Kelly’s Covariation Model of Attribution Scenario: Imagine that your friend John has told you that the movie Inglorious Bastards is really good and recommends that you see it. Do you follow his recommendation? Using Kelly's covariation model, give me examples of information that would lead you to want to see this movie.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
False consensus effect  DEFINITION:  tendency to assume that other people share our  attitudes and behaviors to a greater extent than is actually the case  When we have personal experience with a situation, we usually assume 
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 44

chpt4 - February12,2009 Quiz2 Friday,September18,2009...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online