Lecture 3 - BA 310 Motivation 1 Mcgregors Theory X and...

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1 BA 310: Motivation
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2 Mcgregor’s Theory X and Theory Y Very well-known, though research inconclusive Two contrasting assumptions about human nature: Theory X: the average worker is lazy, dislikes work. Theory X concludes must closely supervise and control through reward and punishment. Theory Y: workers find work fulfilling, can exercise self- direction, accept responsibility or even seek it out. Theory Y concludes managers should allow workers autonomy, and create motivating jobs and organizations. Theory X = work doesn’t hold motivation in itself; Theory Y = work can be motivating in itself
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3 Do you agree? What does that say about your attitude to Theory X & Y? The average human being prefers to be directed, wishes to avoid responsibility, and has relatively little ambition The use of rewards and punishments is the best way to get subordinates to do their work A good leader gives only general directions to subordinates and relies on their initiative, rather than providing detailed and complete instructions. Coaching is an essential element of management
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4 Roadmap: Motivation What are two fundamental kinds of motivation? What is reinforcement theory? What reinforcers are most effective? What is the “expectancy chain?” How does it affect motivation? How do you set a motivating goal? How does equity affect motivation? How do individuals differ in their motivations?
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5 What Is Motivation? Motivation: the willingness to exert high levels of effort to reach organizational goals, conditioned by the effort’s ability to satisfy some individual need
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6 Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation Intrinsic Motivation is seen in behavior that is performed for its own sake or from the sense of accomplishment and achievement derived from doing the work itself (e.g., playing music) Extrinsic Motivation comes from consequences of behavior - material/social rewards or avoiding punishment - and not from the behavior itself (e.g., trash collection) Which one do we want in organizations?
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