3.2_3.3_3.4_3.5_Concrete%20rev

3.2_3.3_3.4_3.5_Concrete%20rev - Forms...

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Forms Review diagrams in Chapter 3. Note differences for terms Cleat and  Stud (On a Beam a Cleat is a horizontal  member transferring load).
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Forms
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Forms
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Forms
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Forming Floors Slab-on-grade – Require perimeter and  opening forms only. Supported Floors require forms and  ‘support’ Typically Bracing refers to lateral loads Shoring refers to vertical loads
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Slab On Grade
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Typical Bracing
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Typical Shoring
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Flying Forms Entire form sections designed to be  dropped and moved without  dismantling. Typically horizontal members (i.e., Floor  Systems or Beam/Girder Systems)
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Flying Form System
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Waffle Form System
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Reinforcement (3.4) Concrete strong in compression and weak in  tension. Reinforcement is placed in concrete to resist  tension, shear, and shrinking (cracking). Placement and size of reinforcement is  designed.
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Steel Reinforcement Temperature Steel – Designed to resist  shrinkage and cracking (placed  perpendicular to structural steel). Structural Steel used to resist  compression, tension, and shear.
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Reinforcing Bars “Rebar” No. x 1/8 th  inch equals diameter Typically stamped Epoxy coating (green) Normal or Deformed Min. and Max. Spacing
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Rebar
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WWF Welded Wire Fabric (WWF) – Very  common temperature steel. Fiberglass may be added in lieu of  WWF. WWF Accessories – Support ‘chairs’  (bricks are common) (page 138).
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WWF
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Brick Chairs with #4 Bar
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Stay-In-Place Form (Decking)
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Design and Placement Manual of Standard Practice published by  Concrete Reinforcing Steel Institute. http://www.crsi.org/ Design notes total number and type of  reinforcement. Steel deliveries usually come in mass 
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3.2_3.3_3.4_3.5_Concrete%20rev - Forms...

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