4.1_4.2_Masonry%20rev

4.1_4.2_Masonry%20rev - Masonry4.1and4.2 Division4Masonry

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Masonry 4.1 and 4.2
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Division 4 - Masonry Exterior masonry walls must be able to: Carry applied loads Watertight Durable Resistant to heat, sound, and fire when  properties required
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Masonry consists of the  following: Masonry units – brick and concrete  block Stone
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Masonry History Primitive structures made of stone filled with  mud to keep out wind and rain. Does everything relate back to Rome?   Romans used kilns to produce burned-clay  roofing tile and bricks.  Also developed  hydraulic cement. Architecturally – Arches and the ‘Pendative’  were developed. For structural purposes masonry has been  replaced with steel and concrete.
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CMU Interior Fill Wall
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CMU Exterior Retaining Wall
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Brick Exterior Finish
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Brick Wall Ties (Eyelet)
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Mortar Mortar – Combination of one or more of  the following: Portland cement Lime Masonry cement Well graded aggregate (sand) Enough clean water to make workable Placed in joints between masonry.
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Grout Grout can mean different things to  different people. For this division (book): 1. Fill voids in both reinforced and un- reinforced masonry 2. Tile setting grout
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Mortar and Grout Placement Mortar is placed between masonry and  stone joints – typically placed by hand  with trowel. Grout is placed to fill joints – typically  poured to fill voids or worked between  tile.
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Mortar and Grout Properties Similar to concrete, the plasticity of the mix  and final cured properties must be  considered. Plastic properties:
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This note was uploaded on 02/12/2010 for the course BCN 1210 taught by Professor Fobair during the Spring '09 term at University of Florida.

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4.1_4.2_Masonry%20rev - Masonry4.1and4.2 Division4Masonry

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