60.2_Woods%20rev - Division6Woodsand Plastics...

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Division 6 – Woods and  Plastics
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Various Regions Throughout US  Produce Different Species
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Lumber as an industry
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Maximize Wood Yield
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Moisture Content Cellular  Structure
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Understanding Moisture Content Greatest stiffness  9% or less Greater load without splitting 10% Greater strength (with splitting) 22%
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Initial Process
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Felling, Bucking, and  Bandsawing
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Milling Process
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Manual process
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Nominal vs. Actual
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Woods – Plywood Basics Plywood has two categories – Construction/Industrial Decorative Dimensions – 4’ x 8’ Standard Minimum number of layers – 3 Each layer is called a ply
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Plywood and Other Panels Primarily Softwoods Peeler – Peels sheets of veneers. Dried. Layered – Interior veneers laid  perpendicular to the exterior veneers. Glued – Under heat (300 degrees) and  pressure (150 psi).
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Plywood 85% of plywood governed by American  Plywood Association (APA). Two Types – Several grades Exterior Type Interior Type
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Plywood  Exterior (Grade C or better)- Exterior – long periods of weather Exposure 1 – exposed during construction  but protected afterwards. Exposure 2 – Limited exposure Interior  Moisture-resistant Interior grade glue v. exterior grade glue
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Plywood Grades refer to construction and finish: N – Expensive A – Smooth / Furniture grade B – Neatly repaired C Plugged grade – Underlayment for floors C – Lowest quality exterior permitted D – Lowest quality interior permitted Panel grade combinations A/D, B/C
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Plywood Veneers
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Woods - Plywood  Specialty Plywood Performance rated – also called structural panels  or structural use panels.  Typically given a span  rating indicating maximum joist spacing (know the  application for the rating (i.e., floor, wall, roof)). Overlaid Plywood – Resin reinforced. High Density Overlay (HDO) –  Concrete formwork Medium Density Overlay (MDO) – Paint-able Both tend to lock out ‘grain’ effects of wood. Both tend to be re-usable.
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HDO / MDO
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  • Spring '09
  • FOBAIR
  • Plywood, conventional framing, General Framing, Framing Wood Pole, High Density Overlay, Medium Density Overlay

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