Class 2 [AMERICAN ENGLISH - ORIGINS AND HISTORY] SP10jcw

Class 2 [AMERICAN ENGLISH - ORIGINS AND HISTORY] SP10jcw -...

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American English: Origins and History LIN 200 February 4, 2010
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Review Linguistics: Core Grammar Phonetics (articulation, perception) Phonology (mental organization of sounds) Morphology (word formation) Syntax (word order) Semantics (meaning)
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Linguistics Sociolinguistics Class differences Gender differences Ethnic differences Regional differences Language discrimination
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History of English What did we learn? Modern English (1650-present) Early Modern English (15 th century to 1650) Middle English (mid-11 th century to 15 th century) Old English (5 th to mid-11 th century) What kind of changes has English undergone the last 1000 years? Can you think of reasons why?
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Timeline of English
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Historic Influence: Loanwords Loanwords or “borrowings” are foreign words that become part of the borrowing language. Often times the pronunciation and/or meaning get altered in the process. vigilante ( from Spanish) futon ( from Japanese). beef ( from French ‘ boeuf’ meaning ‘cow’)
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Celtic words: (500BC-43BC) Few Celtic words have lived on in the English language. Many British place names have Celtic origins: London, Dover , Kent , & the rivers Thames (/temz/) Roman words: (43BC-c.450AD) Many words from this era are those coined by Roman merchants and soldiers. These include win (wine), candel (candle), belt (belt) and weall ( wall).
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Anglo-Saxon Words: (449AD) Approximately 1/3 of Anglo-Saxon vocabulary survives into modern English, including many of our most basic, everyday words: earth, house, food, sing, night and sleep . By the 7th century Latin speakers refer to this country as Anglia - the land of the Angles - a name that will later develop into England . Latin (from missionaries) (597AD) Many of the new words derived from Latin refer to religion, such as altar, mass, school , and monk , but others are more domestic and mundane such as fork, spade, spider, tower , and rose .
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Norse words: (789AD) Vikings bring almost 2000 new words into the English
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This note was uploaded on 02/14/2010 for the course LIN 200 taught by Professor Julia during the Spring '10 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Class 2 [AMERICAN ENGLISH - ORIGINS AND HISTORY] SP10jcw -...

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