Assignment 1_LIN200_SP2010 Origns of English

Assignment 1_LIN200_SP2010 Origns of English - Lin 200...

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Lin 200 Feb.4 Zhujun Zhao ID#107019262 TA: Andy Canariato 1. The first change had happened is metathesis, in this case, sounds. Confusion happens. Just listen to people trying to say "relevant" or "prevalent"; "cavalry" or "Calvary." The "l" and "v" frequently switch places, same thing with the “s” and “k” in “ask” and “aks”. Another example is the word "asterisk," which often be pronounced as "AS-tu-riks." With “nuclear”, I can see the similar kind of switch, in simplified form, as occurring between the sounds "y" and "l" in the final two syllables, if we render them as "-kluh-yuhr" (the correct one) and "-kyuh-luhr" (the unmentionable). The second reason might be the analogy. Words end in English that end in the two syllables represented by -cle-ar are really rare. The sounds of -cu-lar are another matter. Hundreds of such words bombard our ears daily: "molecular," "spectacular," "particular," "vascular," "muscular," "circular," "macular". . . People are perfectly capable of saying sounds similar to nuclear across word boundaries (eg.: "a new, clear sky”). Reference: The Mavens’s Word of the day
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Assignment 1_LIN200_SP2010 Origns of English - Lin 200...

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