1.25.10_to_1.27.10

1.25.10_to_1.27.10 - 1/25/10 Announcements Section changes...

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1/25/10 Announcements Section changes or adding the class – sign-up sheets after class. Last day to make changes will be on Wed. In the news: Citizens United v. FEC . Landmark ruling on campaign finance law. Broader implications for separation of powers. Vikings’ loss: “déjà vu all over again” (interception in the 2007 NFC championship game). Favre survey Typo alert Four types of typos: Missing a letter or word that does not change the meaning (still want these, but won’t announce them). Copy editor changes something and didn’t catch it. Graphics messed up. The whoppers: factual or other author-caused errors. P.41, Electoral College: number of House members and Senators in each state, not state legislature. P.48, Nuts+Bolts 2.3, arrows for the Supreme Court and President should be reversed. The Constitution PS 104 January 25 and 27 The Constitution
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A Living Document? Can the Constitution--a document that was written more than 200 years ago—still contain the wisdom that allows democratic governance in a modern world? Outdated parts. Amending the Constitution o Ex: 13 th amendment to the Constitution that prohibits slavery Vague Language o Allows interpretation of the language to evolve during our modern times o Example: Interstate commerce Power of Congress and allows o Illegal searches and seizures (4 th amendment) Empirical and normative views on the “living document.” A Living Document ?, cont. Walter Murphy: "The ideals that it enshrines, the processes it prescribes, and the actions it legitimizes must either help to change its citizenry or, at a minimum, reflect their current values. If a constitution does not articulate at least in general terms, the ideals that form or will reform its people and express the political character they have, it will soon be replaced or atrophy." * Basically saying, “If we don’t have a Constitution that changes over time, it’ll become irrelevant.” The Dilemma The major difficulty the Framers faced was how they could create a government that had enough power to take effective action when necessary, but which would not abuse its power and trample on important individual freedoms. Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists. *Federalists = stronger government. *Anti-Federalists = weaker government. More liberty, freedom, The Context of the Constitution Not the first U.S. government; replaced the Articles of Confederation, which became the basis for our government in 1777.
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Attitudes toward government strongly affected by experience under British Colonial rule. Many of the leaders of the Revolution, such as Patrick Henry, were concerned about centralized power. The Origins of the Constitution
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1.25.10_to_1.27.10 - 1/25/10 Announcements Section changes...

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