Chapter6Perception - Perception We have previously examined...

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Perception We have previously examined the sensory processes by which stimuli are encoded. Now we will examine the ultimate purpose of sensory information PERCEPTION - the conscious representation of the external environment.
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Perceptual Organization Some of the best examples that perception involves organization of sensory input was provided by the Gestalt Psychologists. Gestalt psychologists hypothesized that “the whole is greater than the sum of the parts.” They were interested in showing the global nature of our perceptions
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Gestalt Grouping Principles Gestalt theorists argued that our perceptual systems automatically organized sensory input based on certain rules. Proximity Similarity Closure Good Continuation Common Movement Good Form
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Figure and Ground Gestalt Psychologists also thought that an important part of our perception was the organization of a scene in to its: Figure - the object of interest Ground - the background
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Depth Perception One of our more important perceptual abilities involves seeing in three-dimensions Depth perception is difficult because we only have access to two-dimensional images How do we see a 3-D world using only the 2-D retinal images?
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Depth Perception Cues Cue - stimulus characteristics that influence our perceptions We are able to see in 3-D because the visual system can utilize depth cues that appear in the retinal images.
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Types of Depth Cues Depth cues are usually divided into categories, we will consider two types of depth cues: Monocular - depth cues that appear in the image in either the left or right eye Binocular - depth cues that involve comparing the left and right eye images
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This note was uploaded on 02/14/2010 for the course PSY 101 taught by Professor Jackson during the Spring '08 term at Michigan State University.

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Chapter6Perception - Perception We have previously examined...

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