3024-Chap5 - 5. DESIGNING USER INTERFACES IN EXCEL Youve...

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5. DESIGNING USER INTERFACES IN EXCEL ou’ve now seen how to use Excel to manipulate lists of You’ve now seen how to use Excel to manipulate lists of data and how to work with multiple worksheets and workbooks simultaneously. While the Excel files we developed worked as required, ey lso require a good knowledge of Excel to use they also require a good knowledge of Excel to use. In many cases, however, the user of may not be roficient in Excel (or even with computers in general!) proficient in Excel (or even with computers in general!) Thus, it is important that you are able to design a suitable interface for your Excel application. 2007 John P. Shewchuk ISE 3024 Course Notes 5 – 1 ©2010 John P. Shewchuk
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he oal make the application easy to use (and The goal is to make the application easy to use (and foolproof) for the intended user. We will investigate several Excel features which are helpful in this regard: • protecting sheets and workbooks • data validation • providing user controls and macros odifying screen elements 2007 John P. Shewchuk ISE 3024 Course Notes 5 – 2 ©2010 John P. Shewchuk • modifying screen elements
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e’ll o this by continuing with ur nJoCa example of the We ll do this by continuing with our AnJoCa example of the last chapter: • capacity planner uses CAPACITY workbook for planning. CAPACITY workbook: gets data from MPS , CAPBILLS , WORKPLAN workbooks. Let’s start by working with the MPS file, MPS.xlsx . This is the same file we used in Chapter 4. It can be downloaded from Scholar: cholar: Scholar: Resources Application Files Chapter 4: Working with Multiple Worksheets nd Workbooks in Excel 2007 John P. Shewchuk ISE 3024 Course Notes 5 – 3 ©2010 John P. Shewchuk and Workbooks in Excel
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5.1 Protecting Worksheets and Workbooks One important aspect of any data management application to nsure e user cannot make unintended changes is to ensure the user cannot make unintended changes. With the MPS workbook, for example, the user is supposed to roll-forward the schedule, then enter values for period 8 only. But at present, he/she could change any other cell as well (or alter the worksheet, or even delete the workbook!). e (o a e e o s ee , o e e de e e e o boo ) To prevent this, we must protect the worksheet to allow only e desired changes We must then also rotect the the desired changes. We must then also protect the workbook so it cannot be altered. 2007 John P. Shewchuk ISE 3024 Course Notes 5 – 4 ©2010 John P. Shewchuk Let’s see how this can be done.
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5.1.1 Locking and Unlocking Cells The first step in controlling access to the cells of a orksheet is to determine which cells should be locked worksheet is to determine which cells should be locked and which should be unlocked.
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This note was uploaded on 02/14/2010 for the course ISE 3024 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Virginia Tech.

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3024-Chap5 - 5. DESIGNING USER INTERFACES IN EXCEL Youve...

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