NS 345key-1 - does this have for its quality over time?...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
NS 345: Colligative properties and Freezing Point Problem Set 13 points TOTAL 1) What is a colligative property? List the four discussed in class. 5 points total a) -A colligative property is one that varies only with the concentration of solutes in a solution 1 point b) - Boiling 1 point - Freezing 1 point - Osmotic pressure 1 point - Vapor pressure 1 point 2) You went to Wegman’s to stock up on raw chicken. When you come home you realize that most of it will spoil before you have a chance to eat it. You put what you won’t use over the next couple days in your freezer (set at -5˚C). Over the course of the afternoon, water freezes out of your chicken and the meat solutes become more and more concentrated. Below is data illustrating the concentration (molality) of solutes in the liquid portion of your chicken over time as it freezes. Use this data and the equations given to construct a graph of freezing time vs. freezing temperature (on graph paper provided). When will the meat be completely frozen? What implications
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: does this have for its quality over time? Points on graph: (0, -.93), (1, -1.86), (2, -2.79), (3, -3.72), (4, -4.65), (5, -5.022), (8, -5.022), (12, -5.022) 2 points for shape 2 points for accuracy Concentration (m) Time (hrs) 0.5 1 1 1.5 2 2 3 2.5 4 2.7 5 2.7 8 2.7 12 3) How would the general shape of your graph compare to the graph of percent unfrozen water in the chicken over time? They would be the same 1 point The meat will be almost completely frozen after 5 hours or the meat will never be completely frozen because the freezer temperature is slightly higher than the freezing temperature (we took either answer). 1 point Additional question: the meat will never be completely frozen which indicates that it will deteriorate over time as there is still some water available for chemical reactions. 2 points...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/16/2010 for the course NS 3450 at Cornell University (Engineering School).

Ask a homework question - tutors are online