Water 2009 - Water, water, everywhere but not a drop to...

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Unformatted text preview: Water, water, everywhere but not a drop to drink What is Food ? Physical nature of food Solids Liquids Gases Chemical nature of food Composition and characteristics of the specific chemical substances that comprise a product The character of a food product is the totality of the physical and chemical nature of that food Most foods are combinations of phases States of matter in foods Liquids Water (pure, distilled) Aqueous solutions (water + soluble substances) Oils, oil-based solutions Emulsions (dispersions of water and oil) Solids Crystalline salts, sugars Crystalline fats Frozen water Large fibrous protein complexes Large fibrous carbohydrates Gases Air (mixture of several gases) CO 2 N 2 Macro - Constituents of Foods Water Carbohydrates Proteins Lipids Water in Foods All foods contain some water ( 10 - 95% by weight) Water content of foods wet weight - dry weight Water content (%) = wet weight X 100% The total amount of water in a food : Molecular "behavior" of water in foods is often a...
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Water 2009 - Water, water, everywhere but not a drop to...

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